LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social, economic and ecological injustice

Posts tagged ‘INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’

Seneca Carl Jamieson (center) gives a statement to the media outside of the Maritime Charter High School. photo: Langelle/GJEP- photolangelle.org

Buffalo, New York – Thursday 18 October – Maritime Charter High School

From Nekanęhsakt: Friends of Ękwehęwę

Seneca and allies entered a charter school board meeting where Carl Jamieson (rear left) spoke to the board. photo: Langelle/GJEP – photolangelle.org

Buffalo sits on what is traditionally Native land from time remembered, most recently it was the home of the Seneca of the Buffalo Creek Reservation. There is a proposed expansion by the Maritime Charter school on Buffum Street in South Buffalo on to Seneca Burial grounds. The proposed expansion is just a few hundred feet from Seneca Indian Park which was a Seneca burial ground where Red Jacket and Mary Jemison were once buried, and just one block from Indian Church Road where only a few years ago Buffalo Sewer Authority excavated and unearthed remains of the deceased. “Buffalo Creek and Buffum Street are sacred lands and very rich in history and I think that a lot of suggestions of putting a school on a place that’s

Degawenodas (right) glares at Charter School board member when his comments were cut short and he was told he would have to make an official request to speak before the Board at their next meeting in one month.  When asked if the Board would be making its decision about the school expansion before that meeting, the Board said it did not know.  photo: Langelle/GJEP-photolangelle.org

sacred territory, I think there are better places for Maritime schools,” Carl Jamieson said. We are asking the Maritime Charter school to stop their plans for expansion onto what even NYS’s Historic Preservation Office has described as a site having “high cultural, historic and archeological sensitivity”. The people who really stand to gain on this project is Carl Paladino’s Ellicott Development Company which has a big investment and involvement in this project.

More on the Sacred Seneca Burial Grounds from Buffalo Rising

 

 

 

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Note: I had the pleasure of attending the The Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action Camp in the Qualla Boundary, North Carolina. The following article is being picked up by various media.  Orin Langelle 13 October 2014 – Indigenous Peoples Day

GE Trees: Another Form of Colonization

13 October 2014 – From the Indigenous Environmental Network and the Campaign to STOP GE Trees

Source: The Campaign to STOP GE Trees

Qualla Boundary, North Carolina–In the shadow of Columbus Day and the legacy of colonization in the Americas, the Indigenous Environmental Network [1] and Eastern Band of Cherokee community members organized a gathering of Indigenous Peoples from across the Southeastern US for an historic Indigenous Peoples’ action camp against genetically engineered trees (GE trees). Participants condemned GE trees as a form of colonization of the forest.

Danny Billie of the Independent Traditional Seminole Nation, based in Florida points out how real forests "mean life to The People, but Ge trees mean death." Photo: PhotoLangelle.org

Danny Billie of the Independent Traditional Seminole Nation, based in Florida points out how real forests “mean life to The People, but Ge trees mean death.” Photo: PhotoLangelle.org

The Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action Camp focused on building an information-sharing and mobilization network of tribal representatives and community members to address the unique threats posed by GE trees to Indigenous Peoples, their culture, traditions and lifeways. Steering Committee members of the Campaign to STOP GE Trees [2] were invited to present concerns about the social and ecological dangers of GE trees.

“All trees and the variety of life that depend on forest biodiversity have historically and will in the future continue to be a necessary part of Indigenous culture and survival, which GE trees directly threaten,” stated BJ McManama, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network.

The action camp, which took place in the mountains of North Carolina, detailed threats of genetically engineering forms of native trees traditionally used by eastern Indigenous Peoples, specifically the American chestnut.

Cherokee participants expressed fears that American chestnuts, genetically engineered with DNA from unrelated species, would negatively impact their traditional lifeways, saying that GE trees are dead trees with no soul.

Lisa Montelongo, a Cherokee community member, mother of four and grandmother of two speaks of her concerns that Ge trees would impact future generations. Photo: PhotoLangelle.org

Lisa Montelongo, a Cherokee community member, mother of four and grandmother of two speaks of her concerns that Ge trees would impact future generations. Photo: PhotoLangelle.org

“I’m very concerned that GE trees would impact our future generations and their traditional uses of trees. Our basket makers, people that use wood for the natural colors of our clay work–there would be no natural life, no cycle of life in GE tree plantations,” said Lisa Montelongo of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee.

Genetically engineered eucalyptus trees also threaten Indigenous lands in the US South. GE eucalyptus plantations, proposed by GE tree company ArborGen, are planned from South Carolina to Florida to Texas. The future development of millions of acres of non-native and invasive GE eucalyptus trees would threaten Indigenous lands throughout the region with devastating impacts including depletion of water, contamination with toxic herbicides and pesticides and loss of biodiversity.

“This needs to be stopped immediately. This is not how the forest was meant to be used.  The forest gives life to The People, but these GE trees mean death. They are not for The People, they are only to make money for a few rich people,” said Danny Billie of the Independent Traditional Seminole Nation, based in Florida.

100% of participants at the camp oppose the release of GE trees.

Notes:
1] Indigenous Environmental Network is a member of the Steering Committee of the international Campaign to STOP GE Trees.
2] Presenters included representatives of Biofuelwatch, Global Justice Ecology Project, World Rainforest Movement. The Center for Food Safety also presented.

Additional photos not in above article – all by PhotoLangelle.org:

T-shirt of the Cherokee woman responsible for feeding those in attendance at the Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action Camp.

T-shirt of the Cherokee woman responsible for feeding those in attendance
at the Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action
Camp.

Ruddy Turnstone from the international steering committee of the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees and GE trees campaigner for Global Justice Ecology Project.

Ruddy Turnstone from the international steering committee of the Campaign
to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees and GE trees campaigner for Global
Justice Ecology Project.

Frank Billie of the Seminole Tribe from Florida

Frank Billie of the Seminole Tribe from Florida

Youth (bottom right) sit at one of the breakout tables to discuss ge trees. Young people were in attendance at the action camp to learn about issues that would impact their lives.

Youth (bottom right) sit at one of the breakout tables to discuss ge
trees. Young people were in attendance at the action camp to learn about
issues that would impact their lives.

BJ McManama, an organizer from the Indigenous Environmental Network, explains the goals of the Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action Camp to those attending.

BJ McManama, an organizer from the Indigenous Environmental Network,
explains the goals of the Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP
GE Trees Action Camp to those attending.

 

 

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