LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social, economic and ecological injustice

Posts tagged ‘Chilean Uprising’

Image: Santiago Chile – On International Human Rights Day, Dec 10, 2019 people in Chile protested the 400+ eyes lost to the Carabineros de Chile (National Police) during the days of uprising in Chile. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

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GLOBAL JUSTICE ECOLOGY PROJECT

For Immediate Release 06/15/2020                      For More Information +1.314.210.1322

From Chile to Minneapolis: Use of ‘Less than Lethal’ Weapons by Police Draws Criticism as Means to Intimidate and Silence

New York – On Saturday, May 30, Brandon Saenz reportedly lost an eye and seven teeth when he was hit by so-called less than lethal munitions (in actuality less lethal) fired by police. Saenz was reportedly struck by a rubber bullet like munition when the Minneapolis police fired less lethal weapons at people peacefully protesting the killing of George Floyd at the hands of the Minneapolis police.

“Hearing about the loss of an eye by Saenz immediately brought to my mind what happened prior to the COVID-19 quarantine during the peoples’ uprising in Chile,” said Orin Langelle, a GJEP photographer who documented the protests in Chile from Nov 22 to Dec 17 last year for Los Angeles’ Pacifica Radio. “The Chilean National Police targeted the heads and eyes of civilians when they used shotguns to fire rubber-coated metal pellets into their faces.”

“Over 400 people suffered serious eye injuries and some have been rendered completely blind,” said Langelle. “The stories of protesters in the U.S. and Chile about these less lethal munitions show the similarities of militarized police forces attempting to put down popular resistance to injustices in both South and North America.”

Ferguson, MO native and filmmaker, Chris Phillips, was documenting protests in Minneapolis over the killing of George Floyd when he had rubber bullets fired in his direction several times.  He was also hit in the leg by a flash bang/stun grenade during his work to video protests.

Phillips was one of the first professional videographers to capture events and protests surrounding the 2014 killing of Michael Brown. “From my experience filming in the Ferguson and Minneapolis protests, projectiles and chemical munitions have been used liberally, and often it is not preceded by any dispersal order or direction for people to go,” said Phillips.

Phillips believes the way in which less lethal munitions are being used currently seems to be illegal. “Without those directives, it is safe to assume that firing projectiles into a crowd that has the Constitutional right to assemble and protest, and not taking into consideration occupants and residents that are uninvolved in these demonstrations, makes it reckless, alluding to the purpose of serving more of a retaliatory purpose than the intent of keeping the public safe.”

Image from Phillips Instagram page: Phillips holding rubber bullet that was shot in his direction during his work as a filmmaker in Minneapolis.

Chris Phillips is principal director of the Maverick Media Group.

http://www.maverickmediagroup.net/

This indigenous Mapuche man was shot in the head with metal-filled rubber pellets by the Carabineros de Chile (national police) earlier in the morning on November 28, 2019. He was part of a Mapuche land occupation. Carabineros fired metal-filled rubber pellets and tear gas injuring several people at the land occupation.

Orin Langelle is a photojournalist with over five decades of experience.

https://photolangelle.org/

 


PROYECTO DE JUSTICIA ECOLÓGICA GLOBAL 

Difusión inmediata 06/15/2020                          Para más información +1.314.210.1322

Desde Chile a Minneapolis: el uso policial de armas ‘sub-letales’ genera críticas por convertirse en medios para intimidar y silenciar

Nueva York – El sábado 30 de mayo Brandon Sáenz perdió un ojo y siete dientes, según informes, cuando fue alcanzado por un proyectil de las llamadas municiones sub-letales (en realidad, ‘menos letales’) disparadas por la policía. Sáenz fue golpeado por una bala de goma cuando la policía de Minneapolis disparó su armamento sub-letal a las personas que protestaban pacíficamente por el asesinato de George Floyd a manos del mismo cuerpo policial.

“Al conocer el caso de la mutilación del ojo de Sáenz, pensé inmediatamente en lo que pasó justo antes de la cuarentena por el COVID-19 en las manifestaciones populares en Chile”, comentó Orin Langelle, un fotógrafo del Proyecto de Justicia Ecológica Global (GJEP) que documentó las protestas en Chile entre el 22 de noviembre y el 17 de diciembre del año pasado para Pacifica Radio de Los Ángeles. “La Policía Nacional de Chile disparó a la cabeza y a los ojos de los manifestantes utilizando escopetas con munición metálica recubierta de goma”.

“Más de 400 personas sufrieron heridas oculares graves y algunas quedaron completamente ciegas”, dijo Langelle. “Las historias de los manifestantes en Estados Unidos y Chile sobre el uso de estas municiones sub-letales dejan en evidencia las similitudes entre las formas en que los cuerpos de policía militarizada intentan aplastar la resistencia popular ante la injusticia tanto en América del Norte como en América del Sur”.

Imagen: Santiago de Chile- Día internacional de los Derechos Humanos, 10 de diciembre de 2019. Los manifestantes denunciaban los más de 400 ojos mutilados durante las intervenciones de los Carabineros (Policía Nacional) durante los días del levantamiento Fotografía: Langelle/GJEP

Chris Phillips, director audiovisual originario de Ferguson, en Missouri, estaba documentando las protestas en Minneapolis por el asesinato de George Floyd cuando le dispararon varias veces con balas de goma. También fue alcanzado en una pierna por una granada aturdidora mientras grababa las manifestaciones.

Phillips fue uno de los primeros cámaras profesionales que grabaron los eventos y protestas que tuvieron lugar en 2014 a raíz del asesinato de Michael Brown. “Mi experiencia después de grabar las protestas de Ferguson y Minneapolis es que los proyectiles y municiones químicas se han usado libremente y, con frecuencia, sin cualquier orden o indicación previa para que la gente se dispersase”, comenta Phillips.

Phillips cree que la forma en la que se están usando actualmente las municiones sub-letales parece ilegal. “Sin esas indicaciones, es fácil concluir que resulta temerario disparar proyectiles hacia gente que está ejerciendo su derecho constitucional de reunirse y protestar, sin contar con los residentes y viandantes ajenos a las manifestaciones, siendo más bien una acción de retaliación y no para preservar la seguridad de las personas”.

Imagen de la página de Instagram de Phillips: Phillips sujeta una bala de goma disparada hacia él mientras trabajaba grabando en Minneapolis.

Chris Phillips es Director Principal de Maverick Media Group.

http://www.maverickmediagroup.net/

A este indígena Mapuche los Carabineros de Chile (Policía Nacional) le dispararon en la cabeza con munición metálica recubierta de goma durante la mañana del 28 de noviembre de 2019. Formaba parte de una ocupación de tierras por Mapuches. Los Carabineros dispararon goma con interior metálico y gases lacrimógenos causando heridas a varias personas en la ocupación de tierras.

Orin Langelle es un fotoperiodista con más de cinco décadas de experiencia.

https://photolangelle.org/

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On 30 April 2020 I received a message from Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA‘s Alejandra Parra that people were evicted from the Mapuche land re-occupation in Liempi Colipi near Curacautin, Chile. The re-occupation started in early November of 2019. Later that month, Alejandra, Anne Petermann and myself from Global Justice Ecology Project, and Biofuelwatch‘s Gary Hughes went to Liempi Colipi. We were traveling as a documentary team in Chile covering the peoples’ uprising.

Mapuches going through the main entrance of their re-occupation in the Fundo Santa Filomena on US Thanksgiving Day, where the shootings by the carabineros occurred earlier. (2019). Photo: Langelle/GJEP

When I heard that people had been evicted from this community, it struck home. The people in the community had been so generous with us.  They made fry bread, and allowed us to take photos and video of one of their ceremonies–a rare privelege. They showed us around the beautiful land they live in, surrounded by volcanoes, and the next day we joined them on the blockade on US Thanksgiving Day.

That morning, 28 November, the Mapuche communities of Liempi Colipi defended their land occupation when Carabineros de Chile (national police) fired rubber coated metal pellets, injuring several people at the blockade. We shot a one minute video of a Mapuche who came back to the re-occupation the same day as he was shot.  You can watch it here: “Thanksgiving Day” Mapuche Indigenous Land Occupation, Chile.

The following feature uses photography and video from the two days we were in the community, and includes an interview with Roberto Cheuquepan, the “Werken” (spokesperson) of the Liempi Colipi community on the recent eviction there along with news from Chile’s INTERFERENCIA.

Carabineros Special Forces move in to Liempi Colipi

– by Orin Langelle, Startegic Communications Director, Global Justice Ecology Project

in a statement sent to us, Werken Roberto Cheuquepan said, “Yesterday [29 April 2020] we, the Liempi Colipi community, were evicted by Carabineros (national police) Special Forces of the municipality of Pailahueque, following an eviction order on behalf of Ms. María Luisa Lyon, current “legal” landowner of the Fundo Santa Filomena that the community is in the process of regaining.”

The current tenant, José Miguel Chaín, has a lease contract for the Fundo and was implicated in the eviction.

View from the Mapuche re-occupation camp Quilape Lopez next to Liempi Colipi. “Our land is far as you can see…” (2019) Photo: Langelle/GJEP

The Werken continued, “Yesterday, when we arrived at the place of the eviction, where a family from Punto Fijo also lives, in a building used in the past by the caretakers of the Fundo, a Special Forces unit was evicting that family.” He added, “In the context of this pandemic that is affecting the whole world, we did not wish to confront the special forces, as that would mean exposing elder people and those with chronic health issues in our now already reduced Community. So there were no clashes or injuries.”

There is “a growing repression toward communities,” said the Werken. “This eviction continues as the Lyon family wants to destroy the houses that currently stand in the Fundo, but demolition could not be done yesterday as the special forces had to retreat and the heavy machinery could not enter the Fundo. But the community is currently threatened with the destruction of the house in which one of our families now lives.”

When asked what could be done in the U.S. regarding the current situation in Mapuche territory, Werken Cheuquepan said, “the most important thing now is to disseminate what is happening in the Mapuche communities in the context of this pandemic, in which the Chilean State is spending money and resources, sending Special Forces and exposing our communities to disease, without knowing if such forces have undergone any medical tests. It would be very important that what is happening in Chile, particularly in the La Araucanía region, where Mapuche communities, more than ever, are struggling to recover their lands and their Mapuche way of life, and to do so we also need to start recovering our territory, the lands that have been usurped by the landowning oligarchy, by colonists, by forestry corporations.”

From the site of Chile’s INTERFERENCIA regarding Mary Luisa Lyon’s riches in the forestry sector:

Maria Luisa Lyon has a pine plantation on the farm, shares in CMPC and is married to Manuel Montt Balmaceda, a descendant of the emblematic Montt family, founding rector and member of the Superior Board of Directors of the Fundación Universidad Diego Portales. The marriage has five daughters and eleven grandchildren.

Lyon is listed as a shareholder with less than 1% of the ownership of Empresas CMPC SA This is equivalent to 85 million dollars, since FORBES magazine (Global 2000) in its 2019 publication, reported that the market value of the company corresponds to $ 8.5 billion.

According to a BBC World article, these plantations are fast growing, just like eucalyptus, and although they pose a threat to native species, they exist for an economic reason…satisfying demand for products derived from forests, such as wood and cellulose, although they cause dryness in the soil and groundwater layers.

Mapuche Lonko Juan Huenuhueque of Liempi Colipi raises raises his fist as the imminent threat of the Carabineros Special Forces to try and evict the Mapuche communities from the ancestral land they are re-occupying (2019). Photo: Langelle/GJEP

INTERFERENCIA reported that members of the Mapuche community witnessed a conversation between the Lonko (community leader) of Liempi Colipi, Juan Huenuhueque, and the owner of the estate Maria Luisa Lyon. The Lonko asked Lyon not to send in the Carabineros Special Forces into Mapuche territory anymore.

INTERFERENCIA said that according to witnesses Lyon replied that the Mapuche of Liempi Colipi have “a hatred against working people” and that she considers “what they have done to be evil”. In addition, according to these witnesses, Lyon told the community leader that “we are in a world of civilized people,” and that they must stop doing “wild” things. And Lyon said they would be forgiven…”if they know how to use computers– to update and be people.”

Special thanks to Alejandra Parra, Joám Evans Pim, Anne Petermann, Gary Hughes and Cassandra for their assistance in this post.

Please see the four minute video: Mapuche People Speak Out About Their Occupation of Ancestral Territories in Chile

and

the photo essay: “THANKSGIVING DAY” IN MAPUCHE TERRITORY, CHILE – ANOTHER RACIST ATTACK BY THE STATE

plus

a video made for participants at COP 25 – UN Convention on Climate Change Conference in Madrid, Spain VIDEO: STATEMENT TO COP25 FROM MAPUCHE & OTHERS IN CHILE – NO MARKET-BASED “SOLUTIONS”

 

Photojournalist Orin Langelle takes a break by graffiti celebrating Victor Jara in Santiago, Chile. Langelle has been photographing the frontlines of the peoples rebellion in Chile. The musician Jara, a Chilean hero, was murdered by the regime of dictator Augusto Pinochet. photo: Petermann/GJEP

MORE GLOBAL JUSTICE ECOLOGY PROJECT & BIOFUELWATCH TEAM IN CHILE:

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