LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social, economic and ecological injustice

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Santiago, Chile: Protesters tear up street to make projectiles for later street fight with the Carabineros (Chile’s National Police) 2019

 

 

Empty protest pit – 2004 Democratic National Convention – Boston, MA                                                                       photo: Langelle/GJEP

 

Shawnee National Forest / Shawnee Showdown

Shawnee National Forest (1990 – IL). photo: LangelleThe documentary film, Shawnee Showdown: Keep the Forest Standing, recalls past battles in the 1980s and 1990s, when a dedicated group of activists fought on the ground and in the courts to stop clear-cutting, oil and gas drilling, and ATV use in the Shawnee National Forest located in Southern Illinois. Cade Bursell is the director and the film is being previewed at film festivals and colleges throughout the U.S. This photo, and others by Langelle, are in the documentary.

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Temuco, Chile: A Mapuche man addresses a press conference concerning the wildfires that started in January 2017. It is estimated that eleven people were killed, 1500 houses destroyed, thousands displaced and almost 300,000 hectares acres decimated (2017). photo: Orin Langelle

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Santiago de Chile: Water cannons chase crowd. A caustic liquid was mixed with the water to irritate the skin and lungs. Water cannons were strategically used to target street medics and the Red Cross. PHOTO: Langelle/GJEP

For Immediate Release                                                                                                                                             July 9, 2020
 
Buffalo, NY – The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art is permanently closing its physical gallery in Buffalo. The COVID-19 pandemic is precipitating this action as the gallery, known for its cutting edge social and cultural mission, will move its final exhibit on-line. A live virtual exhibit opening of Chile: Peoples’ Uprising / An Exhibition of Images from the Front Lines is now scheduled for July 30.
Buffalo Spree’s Associate Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Licata said of the gallery’s impact, “Buffalo’s activist community has risen up over the past few years, for many reasons. During that same time, Buen Vivir has served as an important outlet for the essential documentation of activism, both here in WNY and throughout the world. Especially in the field of environmental activism, Buen Vivir has helped the voices of resistance to be heard. Its closing is a loss.” Buffalo Spree is an award-winning magazine in Western New York, now in its 51st year of publishing.
Chile: Peoples’ Uprising, previously scheduled to open April 3was postponed due to the pandemic. A live virtual opening is now planned for Thursday, July 30, starting at 1 p.m. Eastern, noon Central, 11 a.m. MST, 10 a.m. PST, 13:00 Chile.
The virtual opening will feature photos and videos shot in November and December of 2019 in the ongoing peoples’ uprising in Chile. From Santiago to the streets of Temuco to Indigenous Mapuche land occupations in stolen Mapuche territory, the gallery’s founders Anne Petermann and Orin Langelle were in Chile during the uprising from mid-November to mid-December.
Joining Langelle and Petermann in the virtual opening will be Chilean activist Alejandra Parra from Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales (RADA) in Chile, along with Biofuelwatch’s Gary Hughes based in California. The four formed the documentary team co-sponsored by Global Justice Ecology Project and Biofuelwatch.
The gallery, sponsored by Global Justice Ecology Project and run by activist photojournalist Orin Langelle, opened on October 3, 2014 with Climate Change: Places, Faces and Protest. It was followed by twelve other exhibits including Pittsburgh’s #notwhitecollective, NYC artist Cassandra, Communications Equipment Seized by FBI Released 14 Years Later (Returned Objects: A Multimedia Art Installation) and The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited.
Photographer Langelle will continue to showcase his work online https://photolangelle.org.
People wishing to take part in the virtual exhibit opening, please register here.
Contact: Theresa Church, Global Justice Ecology Project, +1.716.931.5833  ther[email protected].

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The Gallery issued a press release forthcoming about the above exhibit that postponed the 3 April opening reception and subsequent show due to COVID-19. 
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Buffalo, NY – The ¡Buen Vivir! gallery for Contemporary Art is happy to announce this upcoming exhibit. Photos and videos were shot in November and December of 2019 in the ongoing People’s Uprising in Chile. From Santiago and Temuco’s streets to the Indigenous Mapuche land occupations in the communities of Liempi Colipi and Quilape Lopez, Anne Petermann and Orin Langelle had the honor of being part of the uprising as documentarians. The Red Masks in Resistance movement photo below has history with the performance of !Un violador en tu camino! (The rapist in your path).

Hundreds of women march together into Plaza de la Dignidad. Women have a lead role in the protests, including the Red Masks in Resistance movement, and created an anthem for women’s rights that has gone viral: ¡El Violador es Tu! [The Rapist is You!]. It is performed by women all over the world.

Hundreds of women march together into Plaza de la Dignidad. Women have a lead role in the protests, including the Red Masks in Resistance movement, and created an anthem for women’s rights that has gone viral: ¡El Violador en Tu Camino! [The Rapist in Your Path]. photo Orin Langelle/Global Justice Ecology Project (2019)

April Exhibit at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art in Allentown, Buffalo

Chile: Peoples’ Uprising

An Exhibit of Images from the Front Lines

by Orin Langelle and Anne Petermann

A massive popular uprising in Chile began on 18 October 2019. Millions are demanding a new economic and political system in Chile and a new constitution. Chile’s existing Constitution was written during the Pinochet Dictatorship installed by the U.S. in 1973.

Women have a lead role in the protests, including the Red Masks in Resistance movement (photo above), and created an anthem for women’s rights that has gone viral: El Violador en Tu Camino also called ¡El Violador es Tu! [The Rapist is You!]. It is performed by women all over the world.

Where: ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY

Opening Reception: Friday, 3 April, 6 – 9 p.m. Hors d’oeuvres & refreshments served

 

!Un violador en tu camino! (The rapist in your path) is emblematic of the uprising in Chile. Well directed anger, spirit, strength, art and love:

Lyrics – Organized by a Chilean feminist collective, LASTESIS, the performance was titled !Un violador en tu camino! (The rapist in your path). The song and accompanying dance takes on the patriarchy as the cause both of violence against women and the victim shaming that often comes after. Y la culpa no era mía, ni dónde estaba, ni cómo vestía, they sang (and the fault wasn’t mine, not where I was, not how I dressed).

!Un violador en tu camino!

[Keep arms loose at your side, march in place to the beat for the first eight verses] El patriarcado es un juez

Que nos juzga por nacer
Y nuestro castigo
Es la violencia que no ves.

El patriarcado es un juez,
Que nos juzga por nacer
Y nuestro castigo
Es la violencia que ya ves.

Es feminicidio

[Place hands behind the head, squat up and down]

Impunidad para el asesino

[Repeat movement above]

Es la desaparición

[Repeat movement above]

Es la violación

[Repeat movement above]

[Run in place, but without lifting feet from the ground; move forearms up and down in sync with the feet]

Y la culpa no era mía, ni dónde estaba, ni cómo vestía
Y la culpa no era mía, ni dónde estaba, ni cómo vestía
Y la culpa no era mía, ni dónde estaba, ni cómo vestía
Y la culpa no era mía, ni dónde estaba , ni cómo vestía

El violador eras tú
[Extend right arm straight out in front of you, pointing]
El violador eres tú

[Repeat movement above]

Son los pacos
[Point left]
Los jueces
[Point right]
El estado
[Raise arms, pointing in circle around the head]
El presidente

[Cross forearms above the head]

[Move forearms up and down rhythmically, fist closed]
El estado opresor es un macho violador
El estado opresor es un macho violador

El violador eras tú

[Extend left arm straight out in front of you, pointing]

El violador eres tú

[Repeat movement above]

[Cup hands around mouth to amplify shouting]

Duerme tranquila niña inocente,
sin preocuparte del bandolero,
que por tus sueños dulce
y sonriente vela tu amante carabinero.

El violador eres tú

[Extend right arm straight our in front of you, pointing]

El violador eres tú
[repeat movement above]
El violador eres tú
[repeat movement above]
El violador eres tú

[repeat movement above]

The rapist in your path! (English translation)

The patriarchy is a judge
that judges us for being born
and our punishment
is the violence you don’t see.

The patriarchy is a judge
that judges us for being born
and our punishment
is the violence that have seen.

It’s femicide.
Impunity for the killer.
It’s disappearance.
It’s rape.

And the fault wasn’t mine, not where I was, not how I dressed
And the fault wasn’t mine, not where I was, not how I dressed
And the fault wasn’t mine, not where I was, not how I dressed
And the fault wasn’t mine, not where I was, not how I dressed

The rapist is you.
The rapist is you.

It’s the cops,
The judges,
The state,
The president.

The oppressive state is a rapist.
The oppressive state is a rapist.

The rapist is you
The rapist is you

“Sleep calmly, innocent girl
Without worrying about the bandit,
Over your dreams smiling and sweet,
watches your loving cop.”

The rapist is you
The rapist is you
The rapist is you
The rapist is you

 

BELOW EXHIBIT CLOSED

Fall 2019 

October 11 – 14  culminating on Indigenous Peoples’ Day

 

Exhibit will hang during

The Resurgence: 2019 North American Forest & Climate Movement Convergence

Shawnee National Forest, Southern Illinois (U.S.)

 Portraits of Struggle and the Drivers of Climate Chaos

Durban, South Africa: On 3 December 2011 thousands of people marched in protest of the 2011 United Nations Climate Conference in Durban.
Nicknamed by activists as “The Durban Disaster,” at one point it appeared that the climate talks might actually collapse, but a small cabal of countries held exclusive closed-door talks over the final days to create the Durban Platform. This platform was described by carbon analyst Matteo Mazzoni as “an agreement between parties to arrange another agreement.”

Orin Langelle: Let’s face it. Climate change is here. Extreme weather is happening daily. It’s going to get worse as the next decade or so progresses. If nothing is seriously done, humans may very well become extinct taking most of other species with them. At this point in history life is severely out of balance. The Hopi word is koyaanisqatsi.

So how did we end up at this juncture between life and extinction? There are many reasons why. Science has solid facts. I’ve been a photographer for five decades and for the last twenty-five years I’ve been identifying and photographing the driving forces of climate change.

It has been my mission to identify and document the roots of this devastation. A tiny number of ultra-rich elites and their governing frameworks that include neoliberal economics and multinational corporate control (globalization) are the major drivers of climate change. I have documented peoples’ resistance to the systems enabling their ongoing domination: the institutions like the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (WTO); policies such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) or the defeated Free Trade Area of the Americas; the money rich governments and their meetings with the Group of Eight (G8) and Group of Twenty (G20); as well as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

One of the most important things I have learned in my life is that everything is interconnected. As David Brower, one of the most influential environmentalists of the last century, pointed out:

“Ecology teaches us that everything, everything is irrevocably connected. Whatever affects life in one place—any form of life, including people—affects other life elsewhere.”

This is true not just of the natural world, but also of the systems of oppression and the movements that resist them.

As a concerned photographer, I created Extreme WeatherPortraits of Struggle to show a glimpse of some of the peoples and situations I’ve documented. The photographs presented are united by the intertwined threads of social, economic or ecological injustice and peoples’ resilience or resistance to them. Showing and exposing the intrinsic links between these is crucial to understanding the whole

–to seeing the big picture–instead of compartmentalizing each separately. If we want to successfully challenge injustice, we must understand these connections. We must be able to see that the root causes of these problems are often one and the same. Then we can successfully confront them.

Doom is not inevitable. Change is possible. The photographs in this exhibit document impacts of and resistance to climate change and false solutions, spanning five continents and more than twenty-five years.

While there is no magic bullet, no technological fix that will enable humans and other species to survive this crisis, there are thousands of solutions already in place around the world. These solutions are small in scale and controlled by communities, not corporations.

But standing in the way of these real solutions are dangerous false solutions that we both need to be aware of and to actively oppose. This exhibit, for example, shows how forest carbon offset projects in the Americas have triggered or are threatening violent evictions of forest-dependent communities and Indigenous Peoples, with women and children most at risk.

Further photos document people confronting those in power–those who threaten the web of life on Earth.

Through my work I uncover these hidden, forgotten or unknown stories. My photographs are historical documentation of realities that must not be lost: the victories of movements against overwhelming odds. Those in power cover up this history or twist to their own ends­–especially those truths that contradict the sanitized versions of reality that advance their goals.

My photos document not only the present but also the past. History is a great teacher–when presented truthfully.

In what seems to be society’s race to oblivion, I use this documentation of history to disrupt the sense of inevitability and hopelessness so many people feel. My photos can help shed light on alternatives and directly confront the distorted, commodified version of reality that those in power insist is truth.

My photographs are not merely a chronicling of history, but a call out to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a new world. For there has never been a time when this has been more important.

Sample this upcoming exhibit by looking into a past similar show, Portraits of Struggle. It premiered in Buffalo’s CEPA: CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY & VISUAL ARTS, Flux Gallery, that ran January through February 2018.

 

We would like to thank The New Visions Foundation

the generosity of our supporters

and

The Puffin Foundation

 

 

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