LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social, economic and ecological injustice

Posts from the ‘Activism’ category

Note: Sadly my scanner refused to work today and scan more of the photos from this period in history. History can be a revolutionary teacher. Since this is a presidential election year, please see the end of this essay for a quote from Mumia Abu-Jamal on what elections mean.- Orin Langelle

Two protesters slammed to the asphalt by police as they tried to block President Bill Clinton and his motorcade from attending the National Governor’s Association conference in the Sheraton Hotel in Burlington, VT – Photo: Langelle (1995)

Burlington, VT- National Governors’ Conference July 28-Aug 1, 1995

Four days of militant protest in defense of political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal

 

Governor Ridge Welcoming Committee

All photos by Orin Langelle (1995)

Burlington, VT – A coalition of groups demonstrated against the impending execution of award-winning journalist and political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal during the National Governor’s Association conference held in that city. The militant protests spanned five days from July 28th to August 1st, and were directed at Pennsylvania’s then Governor Tom Ridge, who signed the death warrant for Jamal.  Jamal was to be executed August 17, 1995.  Ultimately the death warrant was rescinded and Abu-Jamal is still alive.  Ridge later became the Director of Homeland Security after September 11, 2001.

The convener of the conference, VT Governor Howard Dean went on to run for president, but that’s another story…

Burlington was not the only city that erupted in defense of Abu-Jamal. Protests were international.

Many suffer from the induced historical amnesia caused by the corporate press, incessant advertising and so on.  In an effort to counter that collective amnesia, and in time for the Northeast Governor’s Conference and protests this weekend in Burlington, VT,  we are providing this photo of the month from the 1995 National Governor’s Association conference protests, plus below are a few excerpts from Refuse and Resist (in their own words) that describe in detail the events that occurred over those 5 days of militant protest.

[I could not find the link for this post but it is an authentic and was covered on the ground]

“We not only rained on the Governors’ Conference parade,” said Deb Ormsbee, “we pissed on it!” Ormsbee, of the Burlington Solidarity Coalition, was one of the 8 arrested on Monday’s street blockade in front of the Sheraton hotel where President Clinton addressed the governors. There were a total of 24 arrests by Mumia supporters during the four day conference. All 24 arrestees are out of custody from the state.

From Refuse and Resist:

Burlington, VT, Thursday, July 28, 1995 —

…Bishop Angell of the Catholic Diocese of Burlington issued a press release asking Pennsylvania Governor Ridge to rescind the warrant of execution of the four men scheduled for death in August. Bishop Angell joined Philadelphia Cardinal Bevilacqua who strongly encouraged Ridge to not allow the imposition of the death penalty.

 

Breakfast was spoiled when the governors arrived at the Ethan Allen Homestead, named after Ethan Allen, who stole Abenaki Indigenous Peoples’ land in the 1700’s

 

Friday, July 29, 1995

Today, Saturday, July 29, there was a low-key opening to the National Governors Convention in the small liberal city of Burlington, Vermont, but Mumia supporters have already taken to the streets to show their anger to governor Ridge.

Two women Mumia supporters breached Sheraton hotel security and set foot in the Emerald Ballroom where a plenary session of the Governors’ Conference was taking place on July 29. The women were escorted out shouting, “Free Mumia Now!”

Other clandestine activities occurred that the Mumia Solidarity Coalition were not privy to or involved with during the four days of militant action here. Saturday morning’s breakfast was spoiled when the governors arrived at the Ethan Allen Homestead; named after Vermont’s first famous racist, Ethan Allen, who blatantly stole Abenaki indigenous peoples’ land in the 1700’s. The museum garage was spray painted with numerous slogans including, “Fuck You Gov Tom Ridge, Ridge is a racist”, and “FREE MUMIA.” Vermont Governor Howard Dean called the graffiti, “an embarrassment to the state.” Other reports came in that the electric buses transporting the governors at various times were also egged.

Words and image of the rage against a system of death

 

 

 

 

In a park by a pretty lake, the Progressive Coalition (surely everyone out there knows Bernie Sanders? the so-called “socialist” (NOT!) congressman from Vermont) organized an alternative event called the People’s Conference for Economic Democracy. There were lots of speakers and a parade of 2,000 people through the city. This march was led by a theatre group with an awesome big “Free Mumia!” banner.

Peter Schumann with Bread and Puppet lead the march. Schumann is the founder and director of the Bread & Puppet Theater

At the back of the march, there was a bloc of 200 Mumia supporters. Despite being a wicked hot day (ouch! I feel the sunburn as I type!) the mood was good. The Mumia bloc led a diversion near the end of the march and went right to the front doors of the Radisson Hotel where the governors and their families and staff are mostly staying. Other folks joined in and there was an awesome crowd of like 300 people chanting really loud stuff and a very nervous line of Vermont police and hotel staff keeping people out. Lots of media, too, like C-SPAN and CNN and others. Eventually people ended the hotel siege feeling really good. (The police dogs showed up after we had already left.)

In the evening, actions continued as 100 Mumia supporters took to the streets and headed down to the lakefront where the governors were having a nice dinner. Police set up barricades, so people just took over the streets and caused traffic havoc. Some buses of important people got snarled, but eventually made it in by another entrance. This whole deal lasted in the streets for about two hours. The cops threatened to intervene, but didn’t. Then we went back to the downtown shopping street where there was a tent set up for a nice dinner for the staff people, complete with crappy Vermont country music. We responded with newspaper boxes used for a metal jam and other general noise making. All the people trying to enjoy their quaint evening looked less than happy. As did the cops.

Oh yeah, while we were messing up evening traffic, a group of four people got onto the New York-Vermont ferry boat which comes into port right next to the boathouse where the governors were dining and unfurled a huge “Free Mumia!” banner which was viewed by all the governors. Hopefully Ridge saw this! These people were not arrested and were simply escorted away after getting off the boat. They even kept the banner! Good job!

All in all, a really spirited day. Our goal today was to be loud, make our presence known, and come away feeling good. I think that was all accomplished. The action at the hotel was cool, the only bummer being the realization that if a few hundred more people could have mobilized for this, it would have been amazing. There aren’t that many cops, and they aren’t too sure how to handle an angry demo. Oh well! Big thanks to all the comrades that did come, from New Jersey, Maine, Pennsylvania, Canada…lots of places!

So, no arrests today, but tomorrow, Sunday, July 30 is the day we are aiming for. With hopefully more people coming into town, we will march from downtown up to the Sheraton Hotel where the governors will be meeting. People are very determined to make their presence known! Mumia’s name was definitely heard all around town all day long today, and tomorrow should be even better.

 

[excerpted from several separate reports]

July 30 

15 protestors were arrested today in a spirited demonstration against the planned execution of prize-winning journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal, whose case has become an international cause celebre. This was the second day of demonstrations in Burlington for Jamal that occurred during the National Governor’s Association annual conference. Some 150 demonstrators assembled outside the Sheraton Hotel to confront Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge.

One of the marches for Mumia that week in Burlington

The protest began with a march up Main Street from Burlington’s City Hall Park to the Sheraton. Protestors, traveling from St. Louis, Philadelphia, New York, Montreal, Ontario and Boston, said that they had come to raise awareness of the ‘racist nature’ of Jamal’s case, who is scheduled to be executed on August 17th. “This is a political lynching,” said protestor Robert Newmark of New York City. “The evidence shows that Mumia is innocent and that he is being targeted for political activities.” Jamal was a leader of the Black Panther Party in Philadelphia.

As the boisterous crowd assembled outside the Sheraton, where the Governors were meeting, speeches were made and chants were shouted like “Stop the execution. Free Mumia Now!” Protestors ripped down police barricades and continually pressed closer to the Sheraton. A group of fifteen, including ten Canadians, suddenly surged over a row of hedges and through police lines in an attempt to gain access to the hotel. Police tackled and arrested the protestors, who were charged with unlawful trespass. ” We are committed to freeing Jamal by any means necessary,” said arrested protestor Jack Winston of Calias, Vermont. “This is just the beginning of a movement that is growing by leaps and bounds.”

Organizers said the demonstrations would continue through the end of the National Governors Association Tuesday, August 1.

 

July 31

Seven law officers, one protester

During Clinton’s downtown visit and tour of Burlington on July 31, several contigents of Mumia supporters vocally were on hand catching the president’s eye. One protester came within a few feet of the president, yelling Mumia slogans. The pristine image of Burlington’s business district mandated by Mayor Peter Clavelle was spoiled. Incidentally, Clavelle, who purports to be the mayor of “the People’s Republic of Burlington” refused Mumia Solidarity Coalition requests to allow pro Mumia supporters to camp in the city’s parks.

Support and legal aid for jailed protesters were overwhelming. At all times during the detentions legal and support teams were present; as were packing the courtrooms during the arraignments.

On July 31, when eight arrestees were being held in South Burlington’s Fire Station, word came that the governors were being transported via bus near the Fire House to Shelburne Farms for a “Vermont Tasting.” Jail support became a mobile protest waving signs and yelling at the cringing governors in the buses. Far from that legal protest, it was reported that as the buses neared Shelburne Farms, they were pelted by eggs.

 

August 1

Protest for Mumia Abu-Jamal, during the final day of the Governors’ Conference, was taken to a newer height. “Come on down or we’ll come up and take you down,” shouted a cop with bullhorn up to a climber perched 200 feet above on the University of Vermont water tower. On that command a 20 by 40 foot banner was unfurled proclaiming FREE MUMIA.

The banner was in full view of the Sheraton hotel where the governors, their aides and corporate sponsors were meeting. The FREE MUMIA banner was up from 8 am to 1:30 pm when the climber was taken into custody by the authorities at the official closing of the Governors’ Conference.

The banner hanging was preceded by three days of militant street demonstrations in opposition to the planned execution of black revolutionary award-winning journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal. The total four days of protest embarrassed the Governors’ Conference and succeeded in gaining media attention for Mumia’s plight.

“We not only rained on the Governors’ Conference parade,” said Deb Ormsbee, “we pissed on it!” Ormsbee, of the Burlington Solidarity Coalition, was one of the 8 arrested on Monday’s street blockade in front of the Sheraton hotel where President Clinton addressed the governors. There were a total of 24 arrests by Mumia supporters during the four day conference. All 24 arrestees are out of custody from the state.

 

the Ethan Allen Homestead; named after Vermont’s first famous racist, Ethan Allen

 

All of the above happened 25 years ago.

 

Final thoughts of this post – Prior to the Barack Obama Presidency, Mumia Abu-Jamal shares his analysis:

“Politics is the art of making people believe that they are in power when, in fact, they have none. It is a measure of how dire the hour that they’ve passed the keys of the kingdom to a Black man…. With the nation’s manufacturing base also a thing of history, amid the socioeconomic wreckage of globalization, with foreign affairs in shambles, the rulers reach for a pretty brown face to front for the Empire. Real change that you could believe in would be an end to Empire and an end to wars for corporate greed, not just a change in the shade of the political managers. That change, I’m afraid, is still to come.”

 

 

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The People Demand – TAKE DOWN THIS RACIST SYMBOL OF GENOCIDE AND SLAVERY

All photos are by Orin Langelle/GJEP
Buffalo, NY – 14 June 2020 – Around 100 people came to the city’s Columbus Park to protest the Columbus statue and demand that it be taken down. All across the country, people are taking steps to remove racist monuments and change the name of parks and other public facilities that celebrate the brutal slave-holding legacy of the Confederacy and its most prominent figures. The Confederacy served to cover up the moral outrages of slavery and dismiss the voices outrages of slavery and the voices of African-Americans whose ancestors were held in bondage, systematically kidnapped, beaten, and sexually assaulted.

KEN-A-RAH-DI-YO speaks to the protesters gathered in Columbus Park. He passed the statement (further down in this post) to the crowd. KEN-A-RAH-DI-YO is a representative for International Native Traditional Interchange (INTI) and is involved with the the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII).

Many Indigenous Peoples and their supporters are calling for the City of Buffalo to change the name of Columbus Park and to remove the monument that now stands there in honor of Christopher Columbus.

Protesters in Columbus Park

One Indigenous person in attendance told the crowd, “I don’t believe the city will voluntarily take the statue down. We’ll have to do this ourselves.” Those words were met with applause from those in attendance.

Hangman’s noose around Columbus’ neck

 

The petition to the City of Buffalo says:

“Columbus did not ‘discover’ anything – the Americas were inhabited by a great diversity of people and cultures. Instead, Columbus established the beachhead for ruthless conquest and settler colonialism and inaugurated the genocidal devastation of whole continents. Many millions of people lived in the Western Hemisphere before the arrival of Columbus, untold numbers of them killed by disease. But disease was not the only, nor the cruelest, of the demons that arrived with Columbus.”

The Petition continues:

“Bartolome de las Casas, who began as an enslaver of the native Taino people of Hispaniola, whom Columbus had “discovered,” wrote of, “…the massacre of these wretches, whom they have so inhumanely and barbarously butcher’d and harrass’d with several kinds of torments, never before known, or heard… of three millions of persons, which lived in Hispaniola itself, there is at present but the inconsiderable remnant of scarce three hundred.” Columbus personally launched the enslavement and genocide of Native people and the colonization of the Hemisphere which would be his legacy.

Sign: Petition

KEN-A-RAH-DI-YO’s statement passed to the crowd:

 

Carl Jamieson

John Kane is a Mohawk who is a radio host and producer, who broadcasts from the Cattaraugus Territory of the Seneca Nation

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Image: Santiago Chile – On International Human Rights Day, Dec 10, 2019 people in Chile protested the 400+ eyes lost to the Carabineros de Chile (National Police) during the days of uprising in Chile. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

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From Chile to Minneapolis: Use of ‘Less than Lethal’ Weapons by Police Draws Criticism as Means to Intimidate and Silence

New York – On Saturday, May 30, Brandon Saenz reportedly lost an eye and seven teeth when he was hit by so-called less than lethal munitions (in actuality less lethal) fired by police. Saenz was reportedly struck by a rubber bullet like munition when the Minneapolis police fired less lethal weapons at people peacefully protesting the killing of George Floyd at the hands of the Minneapolis police.

“Hearing about the loss of an eye by Saenz immediately brought to my mind what happened prior to the COVID-19 quarantine during the peoples’ uprising in Chile,” said Orin Langelle, a GJEP photographer who documented the protests in Chile from Nov 22 to Dec 17 last year for Los Angeles’ Pacifica Radio. “The Chilean National Police targeted the heads and eyes of civilians when they used shotguns to fire rubber-coated metal pellets into their faces.”

“Over 400 people suffered serious eye injuries and some have been rendered completely blind,” said Langelle. “The stories of protesters in the U.S. and Chile about these less lethal munitions show the similarities of militarized police forces attempting to put down popular resistance to injustices in both South and North America.”

Ferguson, MO native and filmmaker, Chris Phillips, was documenting protests in Minneapolis over the killing of George Floyd when he had rubber bullets fired in his direction several times.  He was also hit in the leg by a flash bang/stun grenade during his work to video protests.

Phillips was one of the first professional videographers to capture events and protests surrounding the 2014 killing of Michael Brown. “From my experience filming in the Ferguson and Minneapolis protests, projectiles and chemical munitions have been used liberally, and often it is not preceded by any dispersal order or direction for people to go,” said Phillips.

Phillips believes the way in which less lethal munitions are being used currently seems to be illegal. “Without those directives, it is safe to assume that firing projectiles into a crowd that has the Constitutional right to assemble and protest, and not taking into consideration occupants and residents that are uninvolved in these demonstrations, makes it reckless, alluding to the purpose of serving more of a retaliatory purpose than the intent of keeping the public safe.”

Image from Phillips Instagram page: Phillips holding rubber bullet that was shot in his direction during his work as a filmmaker in Minneapolis.

Chris Phillips is principal director of the Maverick Media Group.

http://www.maverickmediagroup.net/

This indigenous Mapuche man was shot in the head with metal-filled rubber pellets by the Carabineros de Chile (national police) earlier in the morning on November 28, 2019. He was part of a Mapuche land occupation. Carabineros fired metal-filled rubber pellets and tear gas injuring several people at the land occupation.

Orin Langelle is a photojournalist with over five decades of experience.

https://photolangelle.org/

 


PROYECTO DE JUSTICIA ECOLÓGICA GLOBAL 

Difusión inmediata 06/15/2020                          Para más información +1.314.210.1322

Desde Chile a Minneapolis: el uso policial de armas ‘sub-letales’ genera críticas por convertirse en medios para intimidar y silenciar

Nueva York – El sábado 30 de mayo Brandon Sáenz perdió un ojo y siete dientes, según informes, cuando fue alcanzado por un proyectil de las llamadas municiones sub-letales (en realidad, ‘menos letales’) disparadas por la policía. Sáenz fue golpeado por una bala de goma cuando la policía de Minneapolis disparó su armamento sub-letal a las personas que protestaban pacíficamente por el asesinato de George Floyd a manos del mismo cuerpo policial.

“Al conocer el caso de la mutilación del ojo de Sáenz, pensé inmediatamente en lo que pasó justo antes de la cuarentena por el COVID-19 en las manifestaciones populares en Chile”, comentó Orin Langelle, un fotógrafo del Proyecto de Justicia Ecológica Global (GJEP) que documentó las protestas en Chile entre el 22 de noviembre y el 17 de diciembre del año pasado para Pacifica Radio de Los Ángeles. “La Policía Nacional de Chile disparó a la cabeza y a los ojos de los manifestantes utilizando escopetas con munición metálica recubierta de goma”.

“Más de 400 personas sufrieron heridas oculares graves y algunas quedaron completamente ciegas”, dijo Langelle. “Las historias de los manifestantes en Estados Unidos y Chile sobre el uso de estas municiones sub-letales dejan en evidencia las similitudes entre las formas en que los cuerpos de policía militarizada intentan aplastar la resistencia popular ante la injusticia tanto en América del Norte como en América del Sur”.

Imagen: Santiago de Chile- Día internacional de los Derechos Humanos, 10 de diciembre de 2019. Los manifestantes denunciaban los más de 400 ojos mutilados durante las intervenciones de los Carabineros (Policía Nacional) durante los días del levantamiento Fotografía: Langelle/GJEP

Chris Phillips, director audiovisual originario de Ferguson, en Missouri, estaba documentando las protestas en Minneapolis por el asesinato de George Floyd cuando le dispararon varias veces con balas de goma. También fue alcanzado en una pierna por una granada aturdidora mientras grababa las manifestaciones.

Phillips fue uno de los primeros cámaras profesionales que grabaron los eventos y protestas que tuvieron lugar en 2014 a raíz del asesinato de Michael Brown. “Mi experiencia después de grabar las protestas de Ferguson y Minneapolis es que los proyectiles y municiones químicas se han usado libremente y, con frecuencia, sin cualquier orden o indicación previa para que la gente se dispersase”, comenta Phillips.

Phillips cree que la forma en la que se están usando actualmente las municiones sub-letales parece ilegal. “Sin esas indicaciones, es fácil concluir que resulta temerario disparar proyectiles hacia gente que está ejerciendo su derecho constitucional de reunirse y protestar, sin contar con los residentes y viandantes ajenos a las manifestaciones, siendo más bien una acción de retaliación y no para preservar la seguridad de las personas”.

Imagen de la página de Instagram de Phillips: Phillips sujeta una bala de goma disparada hacia él mientras trabajaba grabando en Minneapolis.

Chris Phillips es Director Principal de Maverick Media Group.

http://www.maverickmediagroup.net/

A este indígena Mapuche los Carabineros de Chile (Policía Nacional) le dispararon en la cabeza con munición metálica recubierta de goma durante la mañana del 28 de noviembre de 2019. Formaba parte de una ocupación de tierras por Mapuches. Los Carabineros dispararon goma con interior metálico y gases lacrimógenos causando heridas a varias personas en la ocupación de tierras.

Orin Langelle es un fotoperiodista con más de cinco décadas de experiencia.

https://photolangelle.org/

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On 30 April 2020 I received a message from Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales RADA‘s Alejandra Parra that people were evicted from the Mapuche land re-occupation in Liempi Colipi near Curacautin, Chile. The re-occupation started in early November of 2019. Later that month, Alejandra, Anne Petermann and myself from Global Justice Ecology Project, and Biofuelwatch‘s Gary Hughes went to Liempi Colipi. We were traveling as a documentary team in Chile covering the peoples’ uprising.

Mapuches going through the main entrance of their re-occupation in the Fundo Santa Filomena on US Thanksgiving Day, where the shootings by the carabineros occurred earlier. (2019). Photo: Langelle/GJEP

When I heard that people had been evicted from this community, it struck home. The people in the community had been so generous with us.  They made fry bread, and allowed us to take photos and video of one of their ceremonies–a rare privelege. They showed us around the beautiful land they live in, surrounded by volcanoes, and the next day we joined them on the blockade on US Thanksgiving Day.

That morning, 28 November, the Mapuche communities of Liempi Colipi defended their land occupation when Carabineros de Chile (national police) fired rubber coated metal pellets, injuring several people at the blockade. We shot a one minute video of a Mapuche who came back to the re-occupation the same day as he was shot.  You can watch it here: “Thanksgiving Day” Mapuche Indigenous Land Occupation, Chile.

The following feature uses photography and video from the two days we were in the community, and includes an interview with Roberto Cheuquepan, the “Werken” (spokesperson) of the Liempi Colipi community on the recent eviction there along with news from Chile’s INTERFERENCIA.

Carabineros Special Forces move in to Liempi Colipi

– by Orin Langelle, Startegic Communications Director, Global Justice Ecology Project

in a statement sent to us, Werken Roberto Cheuquepan said, “Yesterday [29 April 2020] we, the Liempi Colipi community, were evicted by Carabineros (national police) Special Forces of the municipality of Pailahueque, following an eviction order on behalf of Ms. María Luisa Lyon, current “legal” landowner of the Fundo Santa Filomena that the community is in the process of regaining.”

The current tenant, José Miguel Chaín, has a lease contract for the Fundo and was implicated in the eviction.

View from the Mapuche re-occupation camp Quilape Lopez next to Liempi Colipi. “Our land is far as you can see…” (2019) Photo: Langelle/GJEP

The Werken continued, “Yesterday, when we arrived at the place of the eviction, where a family from Punto Fijo also lives, in a building used in the past by the caretakers of the Fundo, a Special Forces unit was evicting that family.” He added, “In the context of this pandemic that is affecting the whole world, we did not wish to confront the special forces, as that would mean exposing elder people and those with chronic health issues in our now already reduced Community. So there were no clashes or injuries.”

There is “a growing repression toward communities,” said the Werken. “This eviction continues as the Lyon family wants to destroy the houses that currently stand in the Fundo, but demolition could not be done yesterday as the special forces had to retreat and the heavy machinery could not enter the Fundo. But the community is currently threatened with the destruction of the house in which one of our families now lives.”

When asked what could be done in the U.S. regarding the current situation in Mapuche territory, Werken Cheuquepan said, “the most important thing now is to disseminate what is happening in the Mapuche communities in the context of this pandemic, in which the Chilean State is spending money and resources, sending Special Forces and exposing our communities to disease, without knowing if such forces have undergone any medical tests. It would be very important that what is happening in Chile, particularly in the La Araucanía region, where Mapuche communities, more than ever, are struggling to recover their lands and their Mapuche way of life, and to do so we also need to start recovering our territory, the lands that have been usurped by the landowning oligarchy, by colonists, by forestry corporations.”

From the site of Chile’s INTERFERENCIA regarding Mary Luisa Lyon’s riches in the forestry sector:

Maria Luisa Lyon has a pine plantation on the farm, shares in CMPC and is married to Manuel Montt Balmaceda, a descendant of the emblematic Montt family, founding rector and member of the Superior Board of Directors of the Fundación Universidad Diego Portales. The marriage has five daughters and eleven grandchildren.

Lyon is listed as a shareholder with less than 1% of the ownership of Empresas CMPC SA This is equivalent to 85 million dollars, since FORBES magazine (Global 2000) in its 2019 publication, reported that the market value of the company corresponds to $ 8.5 billion.

According to a BBC World article, these plantations are fast growing, just like eucalyptus, and although they pose a threat to native species, they exist for an economic reason…satisfying demand for products derived from forests, such as wood and cellulose, although they cause dryness in the soil and groundwater layers.

Mapuche Lonko Juan Huenuhueque of Liempi Colipi raises raises his fist as the imminent threat of the Carabineros Special Forces to try and evict the Mapuche communities from the ancestral land they are re-occupying (2019). Photo: Langelle/GJEP

INTERFERENCIA reported that members of the Mapuche community witnessed a conversation between the Lonko (community leader) of Liempi Colipi, Juan Huenuhueque, and the owner of the estate Maria Luisa Lyon. The Lonko asked Lyon not to send in the Carabineros Special Forces into Mapuche territory anymore.

INTERFERENCIA said that according to witnesses Lyon replied that the Mapuche of Liempi Colipi have “a hatred against working people” and that she considers “what they have done to be evil”. In addition, according to these witnesses, Lyon told the community leader that “we are in a world of civilized people,” and that they must stop doing “wild” things. And Lyon said they would be forgiven…”if they know how to use computers– to update and be people.”

Special thanks to Alejandra Parra, Joám Evans Pim, Anne Petermann, Gary Hughes and Cassandra for their assistance in this post.

Please see the four minute video: Mapuche People Speak Out About Their Occupation of Ancestral Territories in Chile

and

the photo essay: “THANKSGIVING DAY” IN MAPUCHE TERRITORY, CHILE – ANOTHER RACIST ATTACK BY THE STATE

plus

a video made for participants at COP 25 – UN Convention on Climate Change Conference in Madrid, Spain VIDEO: STATEMENT TO COP25 FROM MAPUCHE & OTHERS IN CHILE – NO MARKET-BASED “SOLUTIONS”

 

Photojournalist Orin Langelle takes a break by graffiti celebrating Victor Jara in Santiago, Chile. Langelle has been photographing the frontlines of the peoples rebellion in Chile. The musician Jara, a Chilean hero, was murdered by the regime of dictator Augusto Pinochet. photo: Petermann/GJEP

MORE GLOBAL JUSTICE ECOLOGY PROJECT & BIOFUELWATCH TEAM IN CHILE:

CHILE CLIMATE NEWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thirty Years Ago Today

Monsanto’s Earth Day Invaded by Mud People and Earth First!

The mud people were pissed off. Tipped off by Big River Earth First! that the evil Monsanto had taken over Earth Day festivities in St. Louis MO, mud people crawled out of the Earth to take back Earth Day.

To the delight and fright of children and their parents, the mud people made fun of the corporate sponsors of the event. It was a spectacle even the Yippies! from long ago would have approved of.

Earth First! and “Mud People” present a check to the 1990 Earth Day (Smurf Day) Committee in St. Louis, Missouri. Monsanto was the main sponsor of the event. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

The action was the feature evening news story on a major television network affiliate in St. Louis with a reporter attempting to interview a mud person. An Earth First! “translator” fielded the reporter’s questions in English and then translated to the mud person in mud language; the mud person responded in mud language and then the Earth First! translator gave the answer to the reporter.

And below:

Mud person protester explains to counter protest about the free enterprise system and what freedom really is. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

After their successful action, the mud people slithered back into the Earth. But not before one mud person threw a rotten egg at the Monsanto stage. There were no arrests.

 

 

 

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I’m a co-founder of Global Justice Ecology Project and I work with them on strategic communications. Executive Director of GJEP, Anne Petermann, wrote the following message with the staffs input. We intend to be as active as possible in this uncertain time – Orin Langelle
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Global Justice Ecology Project: About COVID-19 – Resources and Information

Dear friends and supporters Global Justice Ecology Project,

We, like you, are doing all we can to keep our families and loved ones safe and healthy.

At the same time, we continue to pursue our mission, which includes understanding the root causes of this crisis and its connection to social and ecological injustice. For the best way to prevent the next pandemic is to understand the roots of this one and ensure we do not make the same mistakes in the future.

Below is a new article that links emerging pandemics like COVID-19 to the destruction of the world’s wildest places. It turns out protecting forests isn’t just about protecting biodiversity, it is also about avoiding another pandemic.

In a March 18th article in The Guardian, John Vidal wrote:

“Increasingly [these] diseases are linked to … disruption of pristine forests driven by logging, mining, road building through remote places, rapid urbanisation and population growth [which] is …resulting [in] transmission of disease from wildlife to humans.

“…change must come from both rich and poor societies. Demand for wood, minerals and resources from the global north leads to the degraded landscapes and ecological disruption that drives disease … Otherwise we can expect more of the same.” from ‘Tip of the iceberg’: is our destruction of nature responsible for COVID-19?

Meanwhile, social injustice and ecological destruction are not stopping for COVID-19. If anything, corporations are looking to the virus to distract people from their ongoing plunder–as well as the government’s support for same, such as the Trump administration’s recent bailout of the oil and gas industry.

We at GJEP are joining others in tracking how corporations and governments are using the COVID-19 virus to crack down on basic personal freedoms–just as they did after 9/11. Never before have so many borders been shut down, travel restricted, millions locked down or quarantined, and businesses shuttered as fear of the unknown mounts.

The data they are collecting on the crisis and its response could forseeably be used as a guidepost on the treatment of civil unrest caused by a future pandemic, climate catastrophe or other emergency that threatens government or corporate power.

Resources for COVID-19 community support and mutual aid, as well as a call to remember ongoing struggles:

As the coronavirus spreads across North America, communities are coming together to support those most vulnerable. Low-income workers, communities of color, people with disabilities, the house-less, and those who are incarcerated, are among those who will be disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and efforts to contain it.

Toolkit: “Preparing for coronavirus crisis: As organizers, it’s time to do what we do best”

List of COVID-19 Mutual Aid groups from It’s Going Down

Here are a few things you can do this week:

1. Act in Solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en:

The Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs are continuing their fight to stop the Coastal GasLink Pipeline through their ancestral lands. Our solidarity cannot stop. This is when the companies will try to take everything.

What you can do: A company called KKR is in the process of buying 65% of Coastal GasLink. If we can stop the sale, we can help stop the pipeline from being built. Take 5 minutes to tweet, email or call KKR and tell them to divest from the Coastal GasLink Pipeline. Don’t forget to sign the #ShutDownKKR petition. It has 125,000 signatures and growing!

2. Take action for a just response to the coronavirus:

·       When Every Community is Ground Zero: Pulling Each Other Through a Pandemic (Mutual Aid Disaster Relief)

·       Demands from Grassroots Organizers Concerning COVID-19 (Transformative Spaces)

·       Calls for a Just Recovery Response to COVID-19 that Centers The Most Vulnerable (The Climate Justice Alliance)

I hope that you find this information helpful in navigating the uncharted waters in which we find ourselves.  Global Justice Ecology Project is taking pains to safely continue to advance our campaigns for protection of forests and defense of the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Thank you and best wishes to you and your family,

Anne

 

Anne Petermann

Executive Director

Global Justice Ecology Project

266 Elmwood Ave, Suite 307
Buffalo, NY 14222-2202

 

 

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Press Statement                               March 17, 2020
 
¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art Postpones April First Friday Event in Buffalo
Chile: Peoples’ Uprising Exhibit Opening to be Rescheduled   
 

Buffalo, NY: Due to the current public health emergency and recommendations for events not to exceed fifty people, the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art is postponing our April 3 First Friday event. The opening reception for our new exhibit, Chile: Peoples’ Uprising, will be rescheduled for a later date. We will be sure to inform you of the new date for the exhibit opening when we make that determination.

Contact: Orin Langelle +1.716.536.5669
148 Elmwood Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14201

 

Chile: Peoples’ Uprising

Images from the Front Lines

Exhibit Opens April 3

BUFFALO, NY – The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art will present documentary photography and videography from the ongoing peoples’ uprising in Chile that started in October of last year. The images were shot by the gallery co-directors, Orin Langelle and Anne Petermann in the months of November and December, 2019 from the front lines of the uprising.

The Opening Reception of Chile: Peoples’ Uprising will be held during Allentown’s First Friday event on April 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue at Global Justice Ecology Project space.

A massive popular uprising in Chile began on October 18, 2019, and continues to this day. Millions are demanding a new economic and political system in Chile and a new Constitution.Chile’s existing Constitution was written during the Pinochet Dictatorship, ushered in during a military coup supported by the U.S. in 1973.

Today Peoples’ Assemblies are taking part in all regions of Chile to create a process that will rewrite the new constitution. Chile’s President Piñera is trying to take control of this process and to crush the protests with extreme violence and repression.

Petermann and Langelle documented street protests including clashes between activists and Carabineros (national police) in the cities of Santiago and Temuco.

As of the first week of March of this year reports state that since the uprising began in October, 36 activists have died, more than 28,000 Chileans have been detained and 4,080 minors arrested. Additionally over 11,000 have been injured by the Carabineros. Shotguns loaded with rubber-coated metal pellets deliberately aimed at protesters’ faces have caused 445 serious eye wounds. Many people have partial or complete loss of vision in one or both eyes. In addition, several protesters have been run over by armored vehicles.

Langelle and Petermann also traveled to two indigenous Mapuche land re-occupations, where communities had taken back 1,500 hectares of their ancestral lands, stolen from them during the dictatorship. On U.S. Thanksgiving, they took photos and video interviews after Carabineros shot and teargassed people in the re-occupation.

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On Tuesday, April 7, Jim Shultz, Executive Director of the Democracy Center, will launch his newest book My Other Country, Nineteen Years in Bolivia? in the BV Gallery from 7 – 9 p.m. The full moon event commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Cochabamba Water Revolt in Bolivia that Shultz was involved in and helped publicize.

The gallery is free and open to the public.

 

Contact: Theresa Church [email protected]GlobalJusticeEcology.org                                                                           +1.716.931.5388                

BuenVivirGallery.org

Santiago de Chile: Water cannons chase crowd. A caustic liquid was mixed with the water to irritate the skin and lungs. Water cannons were strategically used to target street medics and the Red Cross.

Santiago de Chile: Depicting blood and eyeballs in the hands of the government. This guerrilla theater on International Human Rights Day, December 10th, commemorated the (then) 350+ eyes injured, some permanently by the Carabineros de Chile (national police) who intentionally shot people in the face with shotguns filled with rubber-coated metal pellets during the protests.

This young Mapuche is from the community of Quilape Lopez, Chile, which is re-occupying stolen ancestral lands. Elders say the young are the future of the Mapuche, as is the land.

all photos by Orin Langelle / photolangelle.org

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This video includes many of my photographs – Orin Langelle

This video was shot over the week of 25 November, during the trial of Mapuche Lonko Alberto Curamil over manufactured charges that he was involved in a robbery.

Lonko Alberto Curamíl during court hearings in Temuco, Chile               photo: Orin Langelle/GJEP

In fact, his arrest and subsequent year and a half in jail awaiting trial are understood to have been retribution for his role in leading a campaign that stopped two hydroelectric projects on the Rio Cautín, a sacred river to the Mapuche, the headwaters of which start in the snowfields of the Lonquimay volcano.

Rio Cautin. The Lonko’s role in lead a campaign that stopped two hydroelectric projects on the Rio Cautín, a sacred river to the Mapuche, the headwaters of which start in the snowfields of the Lonquimay volcano. photo:Langelle/GJEP

In the video, his attorney Rodrigo Román speaks about the case and the greater issue of state repression against Mapuche people, whose land has long been the target of expropriation for industrial timber plantations.  As another Mapuche Lonko explained, “first they stole our land, now they want to steal our rivers.”

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Also please visit Mapuche Lonko Alberto Curamíl Acquitted of All Charges

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Photojournalist Orin Langelle takes a break by graffiti celebrating Victor Jara in Santiago, Chile. Langelle has been photographing the frontlines of the peoples rebellion in Chile. The musician Jara, a Chilean hero, was murdered by the regime of dictator Augusto Pinochet. photo: Petermann/GJEP

PLEASE FOLLOW GLOBAL JUSTICE ECOLOGY PROJECT & THE BIOFUELWATCH TEAM IN CHILE:

CHILE

CLIMATE NEWS

 

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2019 Goldman Environmental Prize winner to walk out a free man

Lonko Alberto Curamíl during court hearings in Temuco, Chile               photo: Orin Langelle/GJEP

Temuco, Chile – On 13 December the Court of Temuco acquitted Lonko Alberto Curamíl and Werken Álvaro Millalén of all charges, allowing the Goldman Environmental Prize winner to walk out a free man.
His daughter Belén Curamil said, “I am very happy because we knew they were innocent, both the lonko Alberto Curamil and the werken Álvaro Millalén. If they were in prison for so long, it is because they raised their voices and fought for our territory, for the freedom of our Mapu, the freedom of our rivers and the freedom of the people and the Mapuche people.”  Belén Curamil accepted the Goldman Prize on behalf of her father, because he was imprisoned awaiting trial.
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On the morning of Thursday 28 December the Mapuche communities of Liempi Colipi and Quilape Lopez mobilized to defend their land occupation after Carabineros de Chile (national police) fired metal-filled rubber pellets and injured several people at the blockade.

After the photo essay, a short video follows.

All photos by Orin Langelle and video by Anne Petermann.

With the momentum of the national uprising across Chile, two weeks ago, two Mapuche communities near Curacautin, Liempi Colipi and Quilape Lopez began an occupation of 1500 hectares of ancestral lands.

Carabineros illegally stop and prevent traffic from continuing on the road that passes the Mapuche land occupation outside of Curacautin.

The public road is also the main route to Conguillio National Park in Chile.

After an emergency call from the Mapuche occupation about the Carabineros attacking, we were stopped by them at a road block on our way back to help. Alejandra Parra from Red de Acción por los Derechos Ambientales (RADA) and Anne Petermann from Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP) were allowed to proceed on foot several kilometers to the blockade while Biofuelwatch’s Gary Hughes and GJEP’s Orin Langelle were guided by Mapuche toward the blockade by way of a back road.

Mapuche men guarding another back entrance into the blockade

Mapuche put cut trees and debris on the road

These logs block the road coming from Curacautin

At one of the entrances to the occupation

Mapuches on guard

Mapuches going into the main entrance where the shootings occurred earlier that day

One of the men shot earlier that morning returns to camp and is videoed by Anne Petermann and Alejandra Parra

The man was shot in the head with metal-filled rubber pellets by the Carabineros earlier in the morning.

Mapuche Lonko Juan Huenuhueque of Liempi Colipi raises his fist as the imminent threat fades of the Carabineros coming to evict the Mapuche communities from their ancestral lands.

TRANSCRIPT FOLLOWS VIDEO

We want to make a public statement to the Chilean territory, to Mapuche people, to the whole country, to inform about this situation where riot policemen have done things here in the Liempi Colipi community, in the district of Curacautín, La Araucanía region. They have entered the community today-the riot policemen-without any previous dialogue, any eviction order. When we reached them to have a conversation, they started shooting tear gas canisters. They started shooting at us, and one of them passed by no more than fifteen meters away from me. So, we make a public statement for you to be aware of this. There are more injured peñis, on their arms, on their stomach, in their tummy. So, we encourage you to pay attention to this, to be prepared because the riot police officers are coming after us again. Marichiweu! (We shall win a hundred times in Mapudungun!)”

 

 

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