LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social, economic and ecological injustice

Peter Beard stabs forearm above wrist to use blood to enhance artwork on photo of dying elephant. This was at the International Center of Photography, in NYC, at Beard’s first one person exhibit in 1977. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

Global Justice Ecology Project’s Executive Director, Anne Petermann, pays tribute to photographer and artist Peter Beard on KPFK, Pacifica Radio, Los Angeles.

Beard was 82 yrs old when his body was found near his home in Montauk, NY.

 

Orin Langelle, GJEP’s Strategic Communication’s Director shared his time with Beard in 1977 with photos and copy in Goodbye Peter Beard – “The End of the Game”

 

 

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Thirty Years Ago Today

Monsanto’s Earth Day Invaded by Mud People and Earth First!

The mud people were pissed off. Tipped off by Big River Earth First! that the evil Monsanto had taken over Earth Day festivities in St. Louis MO, mud people crawled out of the Earth to take back Earth Day.

To the delight and fright of children and their parents, the mud people made fun of the corporate sponsors of the event. It was a spectacle even the Yippies! from long ago would have approved of.

Earth First! and “Mud People” present a check to the 1990 Earth Day (Smurf Day) Committee in St. Louis, Missouri. Monsanto was the main sponsor of the event. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

The action was the feature evening news story on a major television network affiliate in St. Louis with a reporter attempting to interview a mud person. An Earth First! “translator” fielded the reporter’s questions in English and then translated to the mud person in mud language; the mud person responded in mud language and then the Earth First! translator gave the answer to the reporter.

And below:

Mud person protester explains to counter protest about the free enterprise system and what freedom really is. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

After their successful action, the mud people slithered back into the Earth. But not before one mud person threw a rotten egg at the Monsanto stage. There were no arrests.

 

 

 

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On 16 April 2000, over 20,000 anti-corporate globalization activists greeted the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on the early morning streets of Washington, DC during their annual spring meetings. Demonstrators locked down in intersections and blockaded many parts of the city.

The World Bank and IMF, two of the most powerful financial institutions in the world, created in 1944, are blamed by people in the Global South and elsewhere for destructive programs that have impoverished millions and caused massive environmental destruction.

This was a heady time for the anti-globalization movement with this protest occurring only three and a half months after the dramatic “Battle of Seattle” where activists shut down the World Trade Organization.

All photographs by Orin Langelle / Global Justice Ecology Project

On the morning of 16 April, early morning blockades, like the one above, prevented hundreds of delegates from attending the meetings

 

People, not profit was a rallying cry. Above a mattress in the middle of an intersection and in the background yarn was strung in spider webs to prevent access to the meetings.

 

Some of the demonstrators joined themselves together with kryptonite bicycle locks

 

Huge puppet with timely message

 

The black bloc with another interpretation for the IMF acronym

 

A delegate headed toward the meetings was flanked by protesters

 

Indigenous rights activists marched on the Colombian Embassy protesting illegal oil drilling in U’wa territory

 

Yasuni park lies within the moist forest ecosystem of Amazonian Ecuador and is primarily rainforest

 

El Salvador’s Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional, FMLN was represented in the protests

 

Another intersection locked down

 

 

Riot police and armored vehicles were sent in to quell the protests

 

 

These protesters have a different understanding of the police

glob·al·i·za·tion  noun  glō-bə-lə-ˈzā-shən

Definition of GLOBALIZATION: the act or process of globalizing : the state of being globalized; especially : the development of an increasingly integrated global economy marked especially by free trade, free flow of capital, and the tapping of cheaper foreign labor markets–from Merriam-Webster

Much more deserves to and has been said. For certain, globalization is enabling some people to become vastly richer while many more are made poorer. Under globalization, not only are people are being exploited; they are losing their lands and often their entire communities while the resources they depend on are stolen and exported–often irreversibly depleted from the Earth–contributing to climate change and in turn threatening all life support systems on this planet. – Orin Langelle

Protester cuts the barricade at the WTO protests in Cancún, Mexico in 2003

 

 

Please also see my Photo Essay on Globalization Issues

 

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¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art                                                Postpones April First Friday Event in Buffalo

Chile: Peoples’ Uprising Exhibit Opening to be Rescheduled   

Buffalo, NY: Due to the current public health emergency the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art postponed today’s First Friday event. The opening reception for our new exhibit, Chile: Peoples’ Uprising, will be rescheduled for a later date. We will be sure to inform you of the new date for the exhibit opening when we make that determination.

Contact: Orin Langelle +1.716.536.5669
148 Elmwood Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14201

 

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I’m a co-founder of Global Justice Ecology Project and I work with them on strategic communications. Executive Director of GJEP, Anne Petermann, wrote the following message with the staffs input. We intend to be as active as possible in this uncertain time – Orin Langelle
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Global Justice Ecology Project: About COVID-19 – Resources and Information

Dear friends and supporters Global Justice Ecology Project,

We, like you, are doing all we can to keep our families and loved ones safe and healthy.

At the same time, we continue to pursue our mission, which includes understanding the root causes of this crisis and its connection to social and ecological injustice. For the best way to prevent the next pandemic is to understand the roots of this one and ensure we do not make the same mistakes in the future.

Below is a new article that links emerging pandemics like COVID-19 to the destruction of the world’s wildest places. It turns out protecting forests isn’t just about protecting biodiversity, it is also about avoiding another pandemic.

In a March 18th article in The Guardian, John Vidal wrote:

“Increasingly [these] diseases are linked to … disruption of pristine forests driven by logging, mining, road building through remote places, rapid urbanisation and population growth [which] is …resulting [in] transmission of disease from wildlife to humans.

“…change must come from both rich and poor societies. Demand for wood, minerals and resources from the global north leads to the degraded landscapes and ecological disruption that drives disease … Otherwise we can expect more of the same.” from ‘Tip of the iceberg’: is our destruction of nature responsible for COVID-19?

Meanwhile, social injustice and ecological destruction are not stopping for COVID-19. If anything, corporations are looking to the virus to distract people from their ongoing plunder–as well as the government’s support for same, such as the Trump administration’s recent bailout of the oil and gas industry.

We at GJEP are joining others in tracking how corporations and governments are using the COVID-19 virus to crack down on basic personal freedoms–just as they did after 9/11. Never before have so many borders been shut down, travel restricted, millions locked down or quarantined, and businesses shuttered as fear of the unknown mounts.

The data they are collecting on the crisis and its response could forseeably be used as a guidepost on the treatment of civil unrest caused by a future pandemic, climate catastrophe or other emergency that threatens government or corporate power.

Resources for COVID-19 community support and mutual aid, as well as a call to remember ongoing struggles:

As the coronavirus spreads across North America, communities are coming together to support those most vulnerable. Low-income workers, communities of color, people with disabilities, the house-less, and those who are incarcerated, are among those who will be disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and efforts to contain it.

Toolkit: “Preparing for coronavirus crisis: As organizers, it’s time to do what we do best”

List of COVID-19 Mutual Aid groups from It’s Going Down

Here are a few things you can do this week:

1. Act in Solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en:

The Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs are continuing their fight to stop the Coastal GasLink Pipeline through their ancestral lands. Our solidarity cannot stop. This is when the companies will try to take everything.

What you can do: A company called KKR is in the process of buying 65% of Coastal GasLink. If we can stop the sale, we can help stop the pipeline from being built. Take 5 minutes to tweet, email or call KKR and tell them to divest from the Coastal GasLink Pipeline. Don’t forget to sign the #ShutDownKKR petition. It has 125,000 signatures and growing!

2. Take action for a just response to the coronavirus:

·       When Every Community is Ground Zero: Pulling Each Other Through a Pandemic (Mutual Aid Disaster Relief)

·       Demands from Grassroots Organizers Concerning COVID-19 (Transformative Spaces)

·       Calls for a Just Recovery Response to COVID-19 that Centers The Most Vulnerable (The Climate Justice Alliance)

I hope that you find this information helpful in navigating the uncharted waters in which we find ourselves.  Global Justice Ecology Project is taking pains to safely continue to advance our campaigns for protection of forests and defense of the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Thank you and best wishes to you and your family,

Anne

 

Anne Petermann

Executive Director

Global Justice Ecology Project

266 Elmwood Ave, Suite 307
Buffalo, NY 14222-2202

 

 

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Press Statement                               March 17, 2020
 
¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art Postpones April First Friday Event in Buffalo
Chile: Peoples’ Uprising Exhibit Opening to be Rescheduled   
 

Buffalo, NY: Due to the current public health emergency and recommendations for events not to exceed fifty people, the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art is postponing our April 3 First Friday event. The opening reception for our new exhibit, Chile: Peoples’ Uprising, will be rescheduled for a later date. We will be sure to inform you of the new date for the exhibit opening when we make that determination.

Contact: Orin Langelle +1.716.536.5669
148 Elmwood Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14201

 

Chile: Peoples’ Uprising

Images from the Front Lines

Exhibit Opens April 3

BUFFALO, NY – The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art will present documentary photography and videography from the ongoing peoples’ uprising in Chile that started in October of last year. The images were shot by the gallery co-directors, Orin Langelle and Anne Petermann in the months of November and December, 2019 from the front lines of the uprising.

The Opening Reception of Chile: Peoples’ Uprising will be held during Allentown’s First Friday event on April 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue at Global Justice Ecology Project space.

A massive popular uprising in Chile began on October 18, 2019, and continues to this day. Millions are demanding a new economic and political system in Chile and a new Constitution.Chile’s existing Constitution was written during the Pinochet Dictatorship, ushered in during a military coup supported by the U.S. in 1973.

Today Peoples’ Assemblies are taking part in all regions of Chile to create a process that will rewrite the new constitution. Chile’s President Piñera is trying to take control of this process and to crush the protests with extreme violence and repression.

Petermann and Langelle documented street protests including clashes between activists and Carabineros (national police) in the cities of Santiago and Temuco.

As of the first week of March of this year reports state that since the uprising began in October, 36 activists have died, more than 28,000 Chileans have been detained and 4,080 minors arrested. Additionally over 11,000 have been injured by the Carabineros. Shotguns loaded with rubber-coated metal pellets deliberately aimed at protesters’ faces have caused 445 serious eye wounds. Many people have partial or complete loss of vision in one or both eyes. In addition, several protesters have been run over by armored vehicles.

Langelle and Petermann also traveled to two indigenous Mapuche land re-occupations, where communities had taken back 1,500 hectares of their ancestral lands, stolen from them during the dictatorship. On U.S. Thanksgiving, they took photos and video interviews after Carabineros shot and teargassed people in the re-occupation.

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On Tuesday, April 7, Jim Shultz, Executive Director of the Democracy Center, will launch his newest book My Other Country, Nineteen Years in Bolivia? in the BV Gallery from 7 – 9 p.m. The full moon event commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Cochabamba Water Revolt in Bolivia that Shultz was involved in and helped publicize.

The gallery is free and open to the public.

 

Contact: Theresa Church [email protected]GlobalJusticeEcology.org                                                                           +1.716.931.5388                

BuenVivirGallery.org

Santiago de Chile: Water cannons chase crowd. A caustic liquid was mixed with the water to irritate the skin and lungs. Water cannons were strategically used to target street medics and the Red Cross.

Santiago de Chile: Depicting blood and eyeballs in the hands of the government. This guerrilla theater on International Human Rights Day, December 10th, commemorated the (then) 350+ eyes injured, some permanently by the Carabineros de Chile (national police) who intentionally shot people in the face with shotguns filled with rubber-coated metal pellets during the protests.

This young Mapuche is from the community of Quilape Lopez, Chile, which is re-occupying stolen ancestral lands. Elders say the young are the future of the Mapuche, as is the land.

all photos by Orin Langelle / photolangelle.org

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This was shot last November during the Women’s March Against Violence Toward Women in Temuco, Chile:

Posted In CLIMATE JUSTICE NEWS December 4, 2019 by

Women involved in the protests taking place across Chile have been targeted for sexual abuse and rape by the Chilean National Police (carabineros), leading to marches around the country demanding an end to violence against women. Photo: Langelle/photolangelle.org

Excerpt From Human Rights Watch, Chile: Police Reforms Needed in the Wake of Protests – Excessive Force Against Demonstrators, Bystanders; Serious Abuse in Detention

The police detained more than 15,000 people and ill-treated some of them.

Of 442 criminal complaints filed by the National Human Rights Institute on behalf of victims of abuse, 341 refer to allegations of torture and inhumane treatment and 74 of sexual abuse. Many detainees allege they were brutally beaten by police. Another of the most common allegations was that police forced detainees, including children, to undress and squat fully naked in police stations, a practice banned by police protocols in March 2019 but that still occurs, including before the protests.

The police appear to be more likely to force women and girls to strip than men, based on data that the National Human Rights Institute collected and interviews Human Rights Watch conducted. A Chilean human rights lawyer told Human Rights Watch of a case in which men and women were detained in the same circumstances, but only women were forced to undress, and cases of police touching women’s genitalia after they were forced to strip.

For the full piece, go to: https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/11/26/chile-police-reforms-needed-wake-protests

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This video includes many of my photographs – Orin Langelle

This video was shot over the week of 25 November, during the trial of Mapuche Lonko Alberto Curamil over manufactured charges that he was involved in a robbery.

Lonko Alberto Curamíl during court hearings in Temuco, Chile               photo: Orin Langelle/GJEP

In fact, his arrest and subsequent year and a half in jail awaiting trial are understood to have been retribution for his role in leading a campaign that stopped two hydroelectric projects on the Rio Cautín, a sacred river to the Mapuche, the headwaters of which start in the snowfields of the Lonquimay volcano.

Rio Cautin. The Lonko’s role in lead a campaign that stopped two hydroelectric projects on the Rio Cautín, a sacred river to the Mapuche, the headwaters of which start in the snowfields of the Lonquimay volcano. photo:Langelle/GJEP

In the video, his attorney Rodrigo Román speaks about the case and the greater issue of state repression against Mapuche people, whose land has long been the target of expropriation for industrial timber plantations.  As another Mapuche Lonko explained, “first they stole our land, now they want to steal our rivers.”

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Also please visit Mapuche Lonko Alberto Curamíl Acquitted of All Charges

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Photojournalist Orin Langelle takes a break by graffiti celebrating Victor Jara in Santiago, Chile. Langelle has been photographing the frontlines of the peoples rebellion in Chile. The musician Jara, a Chilean hero, was murdered by the regime of dictator Augusto Pinochet. photo: Petermann/GJEP

PLEASE FOLLOW GLOBAL JUSTICE ECOLOGY PROJECT & THE BIOFUELWATCH TEAM IN CHILE:

CHILE

CLIMATE NEWS

 

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2019 Goldman Environmental Prize winner to walk out a free man

Lonko Alberto Curamíl during court hearings in Temuco, Chile               photo: Orin Langelle/GJEP

Temuco, Chile – On 13 December the Court of Temuco acquitted Lonko Alberto Curamíl and Werken Álvaro Millalén of all charges, allowing the Goldman Environmental Prize winner to walk out a free man.
His daughter Belén Curamil said, “I am very happy because we knew they were innocent, both the lonko Alberto Curamil and the werken Álvaro Millalén. If they were in prison for so long, it is because they raised their voices and fought for our territory, for the freedom of our Mapu, the freedom of our rivers and the freedom of the people and the Mapuche people.”  Belén Curamil accepted the Goldman Prize on behalf of her father, because he was imprisoned awaiting trial.
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Santiago: where militancy, music and art meet and complement each other

Copy and all photographs by Orin Langelle

Protesters tear up the sidewalk to make projectiles for later street fight with the Carabineros (national police)

Santiago, Chile – Last night, 13 December, thousands of people took to the streets lengthening the almost daily protest to almost two months. Plaza de la Dignidad was filled and overflowing down side streets in what was reportedly one of the biggest turnouts to date in the mobilization. It appears unless the government backs down and organizes a constitutional assembly, the protests promise to keep going.

Anonymous musician heads to the front lines. The majority of the front lines are personed by youth.

Tactic diversity, including property destruction, is an accepted part of the struggle, unlike in the U.S. where taking the streets without a permit is often frowned upon. Things are more real here, people do not have the false expectation that there is a future under capitalism or that the young generation will survive the climate catastrophe certain under business as usual.

Person with slingshot fires at the teargas defended Catholic Church where the Carabineros are said to go to mass to confess their sins and receive absolution. Person in foreground is suffering from the teargas.

In Chile and elsewhere in Latin America the Catholic Church for the most part, except under Liberation Theology, has sided with the wealthy colonizers that have taken away land from the Indigenous Peoples and profited handsomely.

Tear gas canisters fired in the crowd are picked up and extinguished in a solution, as seen in the above bottle

Breaking up the sidewalk of the Alemada to make projectiles

Crowne Plaza Santiago

The hotel boasts, “Everything revolves around business, almost. At Crowne Plaza® Hotels & Resorts, life does not stop when business starts. We want you to enjoy everything: increase your productivity, recharge and feel inspired to minimize your downtime and improve your performance. Sometimes, a mojito is as important as a meeting.” But in Santiago people feel a molotov cocktail (or brick) is what is needed to improve the performance of the protests. Santiago’s Crowne Plaza is shut. The tourist industry in Chile has taken a beating due to the uprising.

This metal street light was toppled onto La Alameda moments earlier and used as one of the street blockades. A young person uses it as a tight rope.

Art is always present in the protests

In the city almost every wall is a canvas covered with grafitti and other art

Young person in training

How the government plans in the future to deal with the uprising is unclear except for the ongoing violence used against the people. So far they have used rape, murder, torture, shotgun blasts to the face with rubber coated plastic pellets that taken upwards of 350+ eyes, tear gas and water cannons.

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In Chile where COP25 was cancelled due to the people’s rebellion, and where so many have lost their eyes, here is what we think the logo of COP25 should really look like:

The symbol of the bleeding eye is omnipresent in street art and graffiti throughout Chile

Photojournalist Orin Langelle takes a break by graffiti celebrating Victor Jara in Santiago, Chile. Langelle has been photographing the frontlines of the peoples rebellion in Chile. The musician Jara, a Chilean hero, was murdered by the regime of dictator Augusto Pinochet. photo: Petermann/GJEP

PLEASE FOLLOW GLOBAL JUSTICE ECOLOGY PROJECT & THE BIOFUELWATCH TEAM IN CHILE:

CHILE

CLIMATE NEWS

 

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