LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social, economic and ecological injustice

Posts from the ‘RSS’ category

Leoardo Guajardo’s house was saved from the fire, but all the crops and fruit trees were lost – Investigations into the 2017 fires uncovered that the pine plantations were infested by a borer wasp. The insect burrowed into the trees, damaging them and causing their commercial value to decrease. The logging industry did not have an insurance policy against insect infestations, but it did have insurance against fires. Many in the communities believe the fires were intentionally set by the timber companies to claim the insurance. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle

 

2024 photo essay redux of Chile’s 2017 wildfires 


When wildfires broke out in Chile this month, I began a redux of my previously published photo essay about Chile’s 2017 wildfires – the worst in the country’s history. In the years since, more severe wildfires have scarred the landscape, with 2024’s fires the deadliest on record.



Media blames the fires on climate change, El Niño, higher temperatures, strong winds and drought. While true, another major contributing factor to the wildfire disasters is widespread plantations of highly combustible pine and eucalyptus trees.



From my Photographer’s Statement in the 2017 photo essay:

An international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees arrived in Santiago, Chile, in March 2017, to document the social and environmental impacts of the forestry industry in the country, as well as its links with recent forest fires, which were the worst in Chile’s history.

 

The fires began in January 2017. It is estimated that eleven people died, 1,500 homes were destroyed, thousands of people displaced, and over 500,000 hectares decimated.

 

The Latin American Observatory of Environmental Conflicts


 ObservatorioLatinoamericano de Conflictas Ambientales


 – OLCA sponsored the delegation. Another sponsor of the delegation was Global Justice Ecology Project.

 


I accompanied the delegation as a photojournalist and participant.  To see Chile’s Wildfires: Another Pinochet Legacy continue to 



Global Justice Ecology Project’s page dedicated to the photo essay


  or 


Social Documentary Network


.



Leave a comment

Leoardo Guajardo’s house was saved from the fire, but all the crops and fruit trees were lost – Investigations into the 2017 fires uncovered that the pine plantations were infested by a borer wasp. The insect burrowed into the trees, damaging them and causing their commercial value to decrease. The logging industry did not have an insurance policy against insect infestations, but it did have insurance against fires. Many in the communities believe the fires were intentionally set by the timber companies to claim the insurance. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle

 

2024 photo essay redux of Chile’s 2017 wildfires 


When wildfires broke out in Chile this month, I began a redux of my previously published photo essay about Chile’s 2017 wildfires – the worst in the country’s history. In the years since, more severe wildfires have scarred the landscape, with 2024’s fires the deadliest on record.



Media blames the fires on climate change, El Niño, higher temperatures, strong winds and drought. While true, another major contributing factor to the wildfire disasters is widespread plantations of highly combustible pine and eucalyptus trees.



From my Photographer’s Statement in the 2017 photo essay:

An international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees arrived in Santiago, Chile, in March 2017, to document the social and environmental impacts of the forestry industry in the country, as well as its links with recent forest fires, which were the worst in Chile’s history.

 

The fires began in January 2017. It is estimated that eleven people died, 1,500 homes were destroyed, thousands of people displaced, and over 500,000 hectares decimated.

 

The Latin American Observatory of Environmental Conflicts


 ObservatorioLatinoamericano de Conflictas Ambientales


 – OLCA sponsored the delegation. Another sponsor of the delegation was Global Justice Ecology Project.

 


I accompanied the delegation as a photojournalist and participant.  To see Chile’s Wildfires: Another Pinochet Legacy continue to 



Global Justice Ecology Project’s page dedicated to the photo essay


  or 


Social Documentary Network


.



Leave a comment

Leoardo Guajardo’s house was saved from the fire, but all the crops and fruit trees were lost – Investigations into the 2017 fires uncovered that the pine plantations were infested by a borer wasp. The insect burrowed into the trees, damaging them and causing their commercial value to decrease. The logging industry did not have an insurance policy against insect infestations, but it did have insurance against fires. Many in the communities believe the fires were intentionally set by the timber companies to claim the insurance. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle

 

2024 photo essay redux of Chile’s 2017 wildfires 


When wildfires broke out in Chile this month, I began a redux of my previously published photo essay about Chile’s 2017 wildfires – the worst in the country’s history. In the years since, more severe wildfires have scarred the landscape, with 2024’s fires the deadliest on record.



Media blames the fires on climate change, El Niño, higher temperatures, strong winds and drought. While true, another major contributing factor to the wildfire disasters is widespread plantations of highly combustible pine and eucalyptus trees.



From my Photographer’s Statement in the 2017 photo essay:

An international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees arrived in Santiago, Chile, in March 2017, to document the social and environmental impacts of the forestry industry in the country, as well as its links with recent forest fires, which were the worst in Chile’s history.

 

The fires began in January 2017. It is estimated that eleven people died, 1,500 homes were destroyed, thousands of people displaced, and over 500,000 hectares decimated.

 

The Latin American Observatory of Environmental Conflicts


 ObservatorioLatinoamericano de Conflictas Ambientales


 – OLCA sponsored the delegation. Another sponsor of the delegation was Global Justice Ecology Project.

 


I accompanied the delegation as a photojournalist and participant.  To see Chile’s Wildfires: Another Pinochet Legacy continue to 



Global Justice Ecology Project’s page dedicated to the photo essay


  or 


Social Documentary Network


.



Leave a comment

Leoardo Guajardo’s house was saved from the fire, but all the crops and fruit trees were lost – Investigations into the 2017 fires uncovered that the pine plantations were infested by a borer wasp. The insect burrowed into the trees, damaging them and causing their commercial value to decrease. The logging industry did not have an insurance policy against insect infestations, but it did have insurance against fires. Many in the communities believe the fires were intentionally set by the timber companies to claim the insurance. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle

 

2024 photo essay redux of Chile’s 2017 wildfires 


When wildfires broke out in Chile this month, I began a redux of my previously published photo essay about Chile’s 2017 wildfires – the worst in the country’s history. In the years since, more severe wildfires have scarred the landscape, with 2024’s fires the deadliest on record.



Media blames the fires on climate change, El Niño, higher temperatures, strong winds and drought. While true, another major contributing factor to the wildfire disasters is widespread plantations of highly combustible pine and eucalyptus trees.



From my Photographer’s Statement in the 2017 photo essay:

An international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees arrived in Santiago, Chile, in March 2017, to document the social and environmental impacts of the forestry industry in the country, as well as its links with recent forest fires, which were the worst in Chile’s history.

 

The fires began in January 2017. It is estimated that eleven people died, 1,500 homes were destroyed, thousands of people displaced, and over 500,000 hectares decimated.

 

The Latin American Observatory of Environmental Conflicts


 ObservatorioLatinoamericano de Conflictas Ambientales


 – OLCA sponsored the delegation. Another sponsor of the delegation was Global Justice Ecology Project.

 


I accompanied the delegation as a photojournalist and participant.  To see Chile’s Wildfires: Another Pinochet Legacy continue to 



Global Justice Ecology Project’s page dedicated to the photo essay


  or 


Social Documentary Network


.



Leave a comment


Following a permitted mass-march on November 20, 2003, police clashed with protesters on the streets of Miami. Police used tear gas, rubber bullets, electronic tasers and other less-lethal weapons to attack the protesters. Many protesters and bystanders were injured. An estimated 20,000 or more marched that day in Miami against the FTAA. Trade ministers from 34 countries had come there to negotiate a new neoliberal trade agreement that would stretch from Alaska to Chile encompassing all of the Americas, except Cuba.  The negotiations collapsed and the FTAA failed. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle




Toward Freedom


I went to our PO Box the other day and received the commemorative issue of Toward Freedom (TF) magazine. TF officially stopped publishing the magazine after a 70 year run. I was pleasantly surprised when I opened this last TF and saw I was one of the contributors who was featured, and two of my photos were published. One of them was this FTAA photo (pg. 49).



I was honored to be included with the friends and colleagues I worked with over the years including Robin Lloyd, Greg Guma, Ben Dangl, Charlotte Dennett and many more.



I photographed two covers and wrote several articles for TF on Nicaragua, the World Trade Organization, Free Trade Area of the Americas, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

It’s sad to see Toward Freedom stop publishing. But the struggle continues.




Toward Freedom released this volume of essays by past writers, editors and board members at an event celebrating its 71 years of publication during the Vermont Film Festival in Burlington, VT on Saturday, October 28, 2023. Click



here to download the Toward Freedom Commemorative Book.



Portraits of Struggle


My new photography book 


Portraits of Struggle



 will be released soon! It highlights some of my best work from 1972 – 2023 on six continents. For more information, please visit 



Portraits of Struggle




Leave a comment


Following a permitted mass-march on November 20, 2003, police clashed with protesters on the streets of Miami. Police used tear gas, rubber bullets, electronic tasers and other less-lethal weapons to attack the protesters. Many protesters and bystanders were injured. An estimated 20,000 or more marched that day in Miami against the FTAA. Trade ministers from 34 countries had come there to negotiate a new neoliberal trade agreement that would stretch from Alaska to Chile encompassing all of the Americas, except Cuba.  The negotiations collapsed and the FTAA failed. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle




Toward Freedom


I went to our PO Box the other day and received the commemorative issue of Toward Freedom (TF) magazine. TF officially stopped publishing the magazine after a 70 year run. I was pleasantly surprised when I opened this last TF and saw I was one of the contributors who was featured, and two of my photos were published. One of them was this FTAA photo (pg. 49).



I was honored to be included with the friends and colleagues I worked with over the years including Robin Lloyd, Greg Guma, Ben Dangl, Charlotte Dennett and many more.



I photographed two covers and wrote several articles for TF on Nicaragua, the World Trade Organization, Free Trade Area of the Americas, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

It’s sad to see Toward Freedom stop publishing. But the struggle continues.




Toward Freedom released this volume of essays by past writers, editors and board members at an event celebrating its 71 years of publication during the Vermont Film Festival in Burlington, VT on Saturday, October 28, 2023. Click



here to download the Toward Freedom Commemorative Book.



Portraits of Struggle


My new photography book 


Portraits of Struggle



 will be released soon! It highlights some of my best work from 1972 – 2023 on six continents. For more information, please visit 



Portraits of Struggle




Leave a comment


Following a permitted mass-march on November 20, 2003, police clashed with protesters on the streets of Miami. Police used tear gas, rubber bullets, electronic tasers and other less-lethal weapons to attack the protesters. Many protesters and bystanders were injured. An estimated 20,000 or more marched that day in Miami against the FTAA. Trade ministers from 34 countries had come there to negotiate a new neoliberal trade agreement that would stretch from Alaska to Chile encompassing all of the Americas, except Cuba.  The negotiations collapsed and the FTAA failed. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle




Toward Freedom


I went to our PO Box the other day and received the commemorative issue of Toward Freedom (TF) magazine. TF officially stopped publishing the magazine after a 70 year run. I was pleasantly surprised when I opened this last TF and saw I was one of the contributors who was featured, and two of my photos were published. One of them was this FTAA photo (pg. 49).



I was honored to be included with the friends and colleagues I worked with over the years including Robin Lloyd, Greg Guma, Ben Dangl, Charlotte Dennett and many more.



I photographed two covers and wrote several articles for TF on Nicaragua, the World Trade Organization, Free Trade Area of the Americas, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

It’s sad to see Toward Freedom stop publishing. But the struggle continues.




Toward Freedom released this volume of essays by past writers, editors and board members at an event celebrating its 71 years of publication during the Vermont Film Festival in Burlington, VT on Saturday, October 28, 2023. Click



here to download the Toward Freedom Commemorative Book.



Portraits of Struggle


My new photography book 


Portraits of Struggle



 will be released soon! It highlights some of my best work from 1972 – 2023 on six continents. For more information, please visit 



Portraits of Struggle




Leave a comment


Following a permitted mass-march on November 20, 2003, police clashed with protesters on the streets of Miami. Police used tear gas, rubber bullets, electronic tasers and other less-lethal weapons to attack the protesters. Many protesters and bystanders were injured. An estimated 20,000 or more marched that day in Miami against the FTAA. Trade ministers from 34 countries had come there to negotiate a new neoliberal trade agreement that would stretch from Alaska to Chile encompassing all of the Americas, except Cuba.  The negotiations collapsed and the FTAA failed. Photo Credit: Orin Langelle




Toward Freedom


I went to our PO Box the other day and received the commemorative issue of Toward Freedom (TF) magazine. TF officially stopped publishing the magazine after a 70 year run. I was pleasantly surprised when I opened this last TF and saw I was one of the contributors who was featured, and two of my photos were published. One of them was this FTAA photo (pg. 49).



I was honored to be included with the friends and colleagues I worked with over the years including Robin Lloyd, Greg Guma, Ben Dangl, Charlotte Dennett and many more.



I photographed two covers and wrote several articles for TF on Nicaragua, the World Trade Organization, Free Trade Area of the Americas, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

It’s sad to see Toward Freedom stop publishing. But the struggle continues.




Toward Freedom released this volume of essays by past writers, editors and board members at an event celebrating its 71 years of publication during the Vermont Film Festival in Burlington, VT on Saturday, October 28, 2023. Click



here to download the Toward Freedom Commemorative Book.



Portraits of Struggle


My new photography book 


Portraits of Struggle



 will be released soon! It highlights some of my best work from 1972 – 2023 on six continents. For more information, please visit 



Portraits of Struggle




Leave a comment

In the midst of a revolution, life goes on. Mother and child – San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico (1999) Photo: Orin Langelle

Defiance


In 2018, my friend, colleague and poet, Alexis Latham invited me to publish a photo essay in



ABOUT PLACE JOURNAL,




a literary journal published by the Black Earth Institute dedicated to re-forging the links between art and spirit, earth and society. My photo essay, Remembering Examples: Three Decades of Resistance in Chiapas, Mexico, was published in VOLUME V. ISSUE II in October of that year. On New Year’s Day 2024, the resistance in Chiapas entered its fourth decade. 


On New Year’s Day 1994, the day the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) went into effect, the mostly Indigenous Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) rose up against it for being “a death sentence for the Indigenous Peoples of Mexico” due to its elimination of Article 27 of the Mexican Constitution. 

Article 27 guaranteed people rights to communal ejido lands in Mexico. It was an outcome of the revolution led by Emiliano Zapata–from whom the Zapatistas took their name–in the early part of the 20th century. But in order for NAFTA – the free trade agreement between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico– to be passed, Article 27 had to be eliminated. Its eradication was accomplished by Edward Krobaker, the Forestry Division Vice President and later CEO of International Paper. Many of Mexico’s forests were on ejido lands, which meant they could not easily be obtained or controlled by multinational corporations such as IP.

In defiance of the Mexican government and NAFTA, the Zapatistas took over government buildings, freed prisoners from jail, and engaged the Mexican army in brief combat. The Zapatistas declared their autonomy which continues today.

That uprising inspired people from around the world in the early global justice movement. In November of 1999, protesters shut down the World Trade Organization’s meeting in Seattle, WA. It was dubbed the “Battle of Seattle.”

I’ve been fortunate to travel to Chiapas over the last three decades behind the Mexican military lines to visit the people and document their resistance. Some of my photos from Chiapas are in my forthcoming book called Portraits of Struggle. Find out more about the book and how to order it at 


PortraitsOfStruggle.org

And to view my photo essay in the ABOUT PLACE JOURNAL please click on 


Remembering Examples: Three Decades of Resistance in Chiapas, Mexico


 

Leave a comment

In the midst of a revolution, life goes on. Mother and child – San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico (1999) Photo: Orin Langelle

Defiance


In 2018, my friend, colleague and poet, Alexis Latham invited me to publish a photo essay in



ABOUT PLACE JOURNAL,




a literary journal published by the Black Earth Institute dedicated to re-forging the links between art and spirit, earth and society. My photo essay, Remembering Examples: Three Decades of Resistance in Chiapas, Mexico, was published in VOLUME V. ISSUE II in October of that year. On New Year’s Day 2024, the resistance in Chiapas entered its fourth decade. 


On New Year’s Day 1994, the day the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) went into effect, the mostly Indigenous Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) rose up against it for being “a death sentence for the Indigenous Peoples of Mexico” due to its elimination of Article 27 of the Mexican Constitution. 

Article 27 guaranteed people rights to communal ejido lands in Mexico. It was an outcome of the revolution led by Emiliano Zapata–from whom the Zapatistas took their name–in the early part of the 20th century. But in order for NAFTA – the free trade agreement between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico– to be passed, Article 27 had to be eliminated. Its eradication was accomplished by Edward Krobaker, the Forestry Division Vice President and later CEO of International Paper. Many of Mexico’s forests were on ejido lands, which meant they could not easily be obtained or controlled by multinational corporations such as IP.

In defiance of the Mexican government and NAFTA, the Zapatistas took over government buildings, freed prisoners from jail, and engaged the Mexican army in brief combat. The Zapatistas declared their autonomy which continues today.

That uprising inspired people from around the world in the early global justice movement. In November of 1999, protesters shut down the World Trade Organization’s meeting in Seattle, WA. It was dubbed the “Battle of Seattle.”

I’ve been fortunate to travel to Chiapas over the last three decades behind the Mexican military lines to visit the people and document their resistance. Some of my photos from Chiapas are in my forthcoming book called Portraits of Struggle. Find out more about the book and how to order it at 


PortraitsOfStruggle.org

And to view my photo essay in the ABOUT PLACE JOURNAL please click on 


Remembering Examples: Three Decades of Resistance in Chiapas, Mexico


 

Leave a comment