LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

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Buffalo, NY–On January 27, CEPA Gallery (Contemporary Photography & Visual Arts Center) opened the 2017 CEPA Gallery Members’ Exhibition. Photographers Natalie Dilenno and Orin Langelle received the 2017 Exhibition Awards.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno
CEPA Underground Gallery

Both Langelle and Dilenno will have a solo exhibit at the CEPA Gallery in 2018. CEPA Gallery’s 2017 Members’ Exhibition features the photography and photo-related work of some of Western New York’s most talented artists.

The exhibit runs until March 4, 2017.

The juror was Maiko Tanaka, the new Executive Director at Squeaky Wheel Film and Media Arts Center.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle
CEPA Underground Gallery

Langelle is the Director of the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art and Langelle Photography in Buffalo, NY. Langelle also serves as the Strategic Communications Director of Global Justice Ecology Project.

Langelle Photography and the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art are part of Global Justice Ecology Project’s Social Justice Media Program.

Orin Langelle is a concerned photographer, who for four decades has been documenting social and environmental struggles.

Since 1972 Langelle has documented peoples’ resistance to war, corporate globalization, ecological destruction and human rights abuses. His first photographic assignment was to cover the protests against the Vietnam War at the 1972 Republican National Convention in Miami Beach. Langelle’s Exhibition Award photograph was from that first assignment (below).

Republican National Convention—Miami Beach, FL 1972 Wounded soldier from Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) in a wheelchair during protests against the RNC. He was one of over 200,000 U.S. casualties in that war. Photo: Langelle

Republican National Convention—Miami Beach, FL 1972 – Wounded soldier from Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) in a wheelchair during protests against the RNC. Photo: Langelle

Langelle says, “I approach my role as concerned photographer by not merely documenting the struggle for social and ecological justice, but by being an active part of it. This has enabled me to garner the trust of many of the subjects I have documented, allowing me access that would not have been possible otherwise. In this way, I have been able to expose the truth that is so often hidden by the powers of injustice.”

He continues, “My work is an historical look at social movements, struggle and everyday life.  It is designed to counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer—especially with regard to the history of social and ecological struggles. This is not merely a chronicling of history, but a call out to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a new history.  For there has been no time when such a call has been so badly needed.”

When asked about her Exhibit Award photo, Natalie Dilenno says, “I’ve been studying Yves Kline and appropriated that image because he influences my work so much.”

She continued, “I’ve been making blue artworks recently, so he’s been a major reference for the blue and his concepts that deal with the notion of the ‘void’. A whole. That image is just a more literal explanation of this idea than his blue paintings (and my blue abstract photographs).”

[Note]: Many in the art world consider Yves Klein the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. Klein (1928 – 1962) said, “The imagination is the vehicle of sensibility. Transported by the imagination, we attain life, life itself, which is absolute art.”


Photographs of Natalie Dilenno and Orin Langelle, courtesy CEPA Gallery.

The CEPA Gallery is located at 617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203. Viewing hours are Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

More about CEPA after the current exhibits:

Other Exhibits that Opened January 27 at CEPA

 

David Jaan: I See People

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Lingxiang Wu: A Modern Flaneur’s Possession

Linxiang-Wu-Portfolio-Featured-Image

Exterior Views: The Richardson Olmsted Complex

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Located in Buffalo’s historic Market Arcade Complex, CEPA Gallery is a full-service contemporary photography and visual arts center with impact in both the local and national communities serving approximately 300,000 individuals annually.

With four galleries of changing exhibits and events, multimedia public art installations, arts education programs, and an open-access darkroom and digital photo lab, CEPA creates a vibrant presence in the heart of downtown Buffalo.

CEPA’s programs are made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Originally incorporated as the Center for Exploratory and Perceptual Art to serve as a community darkroom and exhibition space, CEPA Gallery was founded during the Alternative Space Movement in May 1974 by recent graduates of the University of Buffalo.

Throughout its history, CEPA has strived to reflect the creative priorities for working artists, while growing to accommodate the educational and social needs of Western New York’s diverse community. Over the years, CEPA has evolved into a nationally recognized arts center that is truly international in scope, but regional in spirit. It is now one of the oldest and largest not-for-profit photography-based arts centers in the United States.

CEPA remains dedicated to photography and the photo-related and electronic arts, and has developed its programs and opportunities to provide working artists, urban youth, and other individuals with the necessary programs and facilities for the production and reception of contemporary art.

 

 

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This Sunday, 31 January, Orin Langelle will be in Toronto for a  Learning Activism launch party with the book’s author, close friend and colleague, Aziz Choudry at ‘Another Story Bookshop.’ The book was published by the University of Toronto Press.  Langelle will give a slideshow of his photographs that illustrate the book, including the cover, as well as photos exhibited at Buffalo, NY’s ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery, which he directs. Langelle will explain history behind the photographs and the struggles they represent. Following the discussion by Choudry and Langelle, there will be a question and answer period.

Aziz Choudry is Associate Professor in the Department of Integral Studies in Education at McGill and Visiting Professor in the Center for Education Rights and Transformation at the University of Johannesburg. He has been on the Board of Directors of Global Justice Ecology Project since its its founding in 2003 by Langelle and Anne Petermann.

The launch party is free and open to the public.  RSVP for the event on the bookstore Facebook page.

Below the poster is UTP’s description for the book followed by a paragraph about Langelle written by Choudry that appears in the book.

**Choudry at Another Story Poster

Described by the University of Toronto Press:

What do activists know? Learning Activism is designed to encourage a deeper engagement with the intellectual life of activists who organize for social, political, and ecological justice. Combining experiential knowledge from his own activism and a variety of social movements, Choudry suggests that such organizations are best understood if we engage with the learning, knowledge, debates, and theorizing that goes on within them. Drawing on Marxist, feminist, anti-racist, and anti-colonial perspectives on knowledge and power, the book highlights how activists and organizers learn through doing, and fills the gap between social movement practice as it occurs on the ground, critical adult education scholarship, and social movement theorizing. Examples include anti-colonial currents within global justice organizing in the Asia-Pacific, activist research and education in social movements and people?s organizations in the Philippines, Migrant and immigrant worker struggles in Canada, and the Quebec student strike. The result is a book that carves out a new space for intellectual life in activist practice.

Choudry from Learning Activism on Orin Langelle:

The photographs that illustrate this book are another important example of preserving movement histories. These photos by US activist and photojournalist Orin Langelle transcend the sometime clichéd “protest” images that we often see. Integrating photography into organizing/education initiatives, especially around climate justice, anti-globalization, food sovereignty, and Indigenous resistance struggles, his work is a historically informed look at social movements, struggle and everyday life. In Langelle’s words, his photographic work aims to ‘counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer—especially with regard to the history of social and ecological struggles. This is not merely a chronicling of history, but a call out to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a new history.’ Langelle writes that he strives ‘not just to document and expose the harsh reality of injustice—much of which is linked with the struggle for the land—but to inspire viewers to participate in changing the world, while helping empower those striving for justice because they know that photographs of their struggle are revealed to a larger audience.’ As Langelle says, in contemporary struggles for change,we cannot afford societal amnesia.

Special Note:

Seven photographs from Orin Langelle’s last exhibit, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited are included in a show at the Gordon Parks Foundation in Pleasantville, NY. Langelle’s photos document Peter Beard’s first one-person show at the International Center of Photography in Manhattan in 1977.

The exhibit at the Parks Foundation, Gordon Parks: Collages by Peter Beard, features artwork made by Beard over the course of the long friendship between him and Parks. The exhibit is open through April 23.

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The industrial revolution may have brought technological advances, but its reliance on fossil fuels also means that dirty technologies have proliferated, with consequences for our environment and our climate. Photo: Bogdan Bousca (Romania) bogdanbousca.finegallery.net

The industrial revolution may have brought technological advances, but its reliance on fossil fuels also means that dirty technologies have proliferated, with consequences for our environment and our climate. Photo ©: Bogdan Bousca (Romania) bogdanbousca.finegallery.net

Paris, France – Telling the story of the growing global demand for climate justice, featuring images from photographers in Australia, Croatia, Romania, the UK and the USA. This exhibition is on display in Paris during the UNFCCC COP 21 negotiations, at the Climate Action Zone (ZAC), 7-11 December. The address is Room Ecuries C, Centquatre, 5, rue Curial, 75019 Paris. (The closest metro stations are Stalingrad and Riquet.)

It includes images from the following Critical Information Collective photographers, in panels of six images: David Tao (Australia), Luka Tomac (Croatia), Bogdan Bousca (Romania), Orin Langelle (USA), Jason Taylor (UK), and JudithDeland (Australia). There is a seventh panel comprising images from Stephen D Melkisethian (USA), Susan Melkisethian (USA), Joseph O Holmes (USA) and Ronnie Hall (UK).

For the exhibit, please go to UN Climate Conference of the Parties 21 (COP 21) Exhibition: Climate Change—Realities and Resistance

The second showing of this exhibit will be at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery in Buffalo, NY. The exhibit opens there on 4 March 2016. That show will include work by artist Ashley Powell.

Notice that Orin Langelle, Buen Vivir! Gallery director, has one of the panels, Struggles for Justice, with six photographs in the Paris show, that is coming to Buffalo.

 

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Global Justice Ecology Project and the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery invite you to our annual winter Solstice Party.  This is also the closing reception of the gallery exhibit The End of the Game, The Last Words from Paradise – Revisited.

This year the party and closing reception take place on Thursday, December 17th from 6-9 p.m. at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo.

​Camel's Hump, Vermont. Photo: Petermann

​Camel’s Hump, Vermont. Photo: Petermann

Gallery Director Orin Langelle and GJEP Executive Director Anne Petermann will give brief presentations at 7 p.m. about the mission of the gallery and GJEP including ways you can get involved.

There will be music, wine, hors d’oeuvres, and we will celebrate the Solstice and the return of longer days.

We also hope to have some exciting news to share about a new venue for Orin Langelle’s historic exhibit: The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited. If you haven’t seen it yet, this will be your last chance to see it in Buffalo…

​Truman Capote with Peter Beard at Studio 54 during Beard’s 40th birthday party. This photo by Orin Langelle was published in the Adventures and Misadventures of Peter Beard in Africa, by Jon Bowmaster (1993)

​Truman Capote with Peter Beard at Studio 54 during Beard’s 40th birthday party. This photo by Orin Langelle was published in the Adventures and Misadventures of Peter Beard in Africa, by Jon Bowmaster (1993)

Event is Free and Open to the Public. Casual dress.

See you there!

Info: 716.931.5833

Anne Petermann
Orin Langelle

 

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Photographer Peter Beard revisited at iBuen Vivir! gallery

> BY JACK FORAN             Artvoice Weekly Edition » Issue v14n44 (11/05/2015) » Art Scene

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The deeper the white man went into Africa, the faster the life flowed out of it…vanishing in acres of trophies and hides and carcasses. —Peter Beard

r1The current show at ¡Buen Vivir! gallery commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of celebrity photographer and visual artist and environmentalist Peter Beard’s art book exposé on the r2 mass destruction of African elephant herds and other wildlife. The book, entitled The End of the Game-—The Last Word from Paradise, is being reprinted this year in an anniversary edition by the publisher Taschen. The exhibit is titled The End of the Game—The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited. The exhibit consists of photos by Orin Langelle and photos and artwork and writing by Beard. Several copies of the reprint edition of the book are available for inspection, and some of his mad scramble of words and pictures artworks. Wall copy text explains how, beginning in the 1960s, working at Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park, Beard photographed and documented the demise of more than 35,000 elephants and 5,000 Black Rhinos.

Beard was and is a complicated person and his conservation message is complex. Too complex perhaps for the mass media to quite grasp. The demise of big game African wildlife, as Beard saw it, was primarily due to misguided conservation efforts. The media preferred to focus on something more simple and straightforward, like poaching. Further explained in wall copy. In the 1980s, a CBS Sixty Minutes segment attributed the die-off of wildlife at the more than 5,000-square-mile Tsavo East park primarily to poaching. Beard contended that the conservation effort that resulted in establishment of the park was more the heart of the problem.

Long before the 1948 creation of the park—which Beard avers was instigated more by European “game-savers,” as he calls them, than indigenous Africans—native hunter-gatherer tribes co-existed with the elephants. Kept the elephant population in balance was the idea. Following the creation of the park, Beard says, the native hunter-gatherers were rounded up and imprisoned for “poaching,” which then resulted in elephant overpopulation, which led to depletion of food stocks and sources in the elephant habitat area, and ultimately desertification of the habitat area, and elephants died of starvation in vast numbers.

Beard wrote that in the early days of his work in the Tsavo East park, in the 1960s, conservation authorities estimated a total of three thousand elephants inhabited the park. Later, some Ford Foundation scientists counted forty thousand elephants in the park. Beard said the Ford Foundation scientists were forced to resign for suggesting overpopulation as the problem.

A letter explaining the more complex—than poaching—situation was hand-delivered along with a copy of Beard’s book to a number of cognizant individuals in the Sixty Minutes program, including Morley Safer and Harry Reasoner, but had no effect. The Tsavo East show—unaltered—was rerun several months later.

The Langelle photos document two celebrational events of Beard’s career. A 1977 one-person show of Beard’s work at the Manhattan International Center of Photography, and the next year, 1978, his fortieth birthday party at Studio 54 in New York City. Lots of celebrities present at both events. To name some of the better known: Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Caroline Kennedy, Kurt Vonnegut. Some unidentified knockout beautiful women. Beard is 77 now, but in his earlier years he was movie star good looking, and based on the photos did not lack for female admirers. For a while he was married to Cheryl Tiegs.

Many beautiful women, none more so than Iman in a photo by Beard at his home base, called Hog Ranch, near Nairobi. The caption says Beard “discovered” Iman, who subsequently moved to the United States to start a modeling career, and that she is currently married to David Bowie.

The End of the Game—The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited exhibit continues until December 17.

[¡Buen Vivir! Gallery note: We our having a First Friday Reception tomorrow night, 6 November from 6 – 9 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres served.  ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery, 148 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY. Top photo model and actress Lauren Hutton and artist Peter Beard; 1st right photo: artist Andy Warhol; and 2nd right photo: Exhibit designer Marvin Israel (left) and Peter Beard. All three photos by Orin Langelle at the International Center of Photography – 1977.]

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This review of my exhibit was by Jack Foran was published in Artvoice Weekly Edition » Issue v14n23 (06/11/2015) » Art Scene. Artvoice (print and web) is one of Buffalo, NY’s two major alternative weeklies. Additionally, the exhibit continues through June 19, at which time I’ll give a walk-through and talk about the various photos, scheduled from 6 to 8 pm. Wine and hors d’oeuvres provided. The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery is located at 148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201- OL

PORTRAITS OF STRUGGLES

ORIN LANGELLE’S PHOTOGRAPHS ON DISPLAY AT ¡BUEN VIVIR! GALLERY

By Jack Foran

Photographer Orin Langelle’s website concludes with two quotations. From Brazilian educator and philosopher Paolo Freire: “Washing one’s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.” And folksinger and activist Phil Ochs: “It is wrong to expect a reward for your struggles. The reward is the act of struggle itself, not what you win. Even though you can’t expect to defeat the absurdity of the world, you must make that attempt. That’s morality, that’s religion. That’s art. That’s life.” They pretty much sum up Langelle’s life and work.

A potpourri of his witness to the struggle photos from the 1980s and 1990s is currently on view at his r1¡Buen Vivir! gallery on Elmwood in Allentown. Including the iconic photo of an unidentified environmental activist, poised on a log tripod construction, arm and fist raised in spirited gesture of we shall overcome, at a training camp in non-violent disruption techniques in Vermont in the late ‘90s.

r2The exhibit is dedicated to the memory of activist Judi Bari (1949-1997), an activist against redwood logging in northern California who narrowly escaped death when her car was blown up by a pipe bomb—following which she was arrested by the FBI on charges of eco-terrorism. The FBI alleged she had been transporting explosives. Laboratory and other analyses discovered that the explosives inr3 question were placed directly under the driver’s seat and equipped with a motion sensor trigger to cause them to detonate when the car was driven, whereupon the Oakland District Attorney declined to press the FBI charges. Bari filed a violation of civil right suit on matters including false arrest and illegal search. Five years after her death her estate was awarded $4 million in the case.r4

The targets of the protests to which Langelle’s photos bear witness range from roadway expansion schemes in London, England, to golf course expansion and development of condominiums on land sacred to the Mohawk Indians, to logging activities within the Trail of Tears State Forest r5in Illinois, to Hydro-Quebec plans for hydroelectric production facilities on Cree Indian lands in northern Canada, to a protest against the Tasmanian Forestry Commission, Australia, an agency that is supposed to protect forests from rapacious practices of commercial timber interests, for failing to do so.

r6One photo is of an activist arrested—in New Hampshire—for handing out fliers urging people to write to their representatives in Congress in opposition to a timber harvest scheme in the White Mountain National Forest. Another—in Vermont—shows Abenaki Tribal Chief Homer St. Francis standing up in court, when he was told he was “out of order,” responding, “No, Judge, you’re out of order.” The Abenaki apparently had never ceded their land to any state or federal government, and continued to issue their own license plates and hunting and fishing permits. They were demanding that all Abenaki land be returned to them. Ultimately, the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that all Abenaki claims had been “extinguished due to the increasing weight of history.” History apparently was to blame.

Not all the protest activist photos show protest actions. There is a wonderful portrait of a Cree elder woman, looking ancient and patient—but not infinitely patient—taken during the photographer’s journey to Cree territory to learn about and document the struggle against the Hydro-Quebec project. The second phase of the project, that is. The first phase, the La Grande Project dam, had already flooded thousands of acres of Cree land, displacing resident natives and resulting in environmental devastation such as when an untimely water release drowned 10,000 migrating caribou. The second phase was another dam proposal that was postponed indefinitely following protests in Canada and worldwide. One photo shows protesters in front of the Quebec consulate in London with a banner denouncing the hydropower scheme. The second phase was ironically well-named. It was called the Great Whale Project.

The exhibit continues through June 19, at which time Langelle will give a walk-through and talk about the various photos, scheduled from 6 to 8 pm.

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Ecological perspectives for Science and and Society

Ökologische Perspektiven Für Wissenschaft Und Gesellschaft

photo: Langelle

photo: Langelle

The photograph was used by the European journal GAiA for the cover of their first 2015 publication.

GAiA describes itself as an inter- and transdisciplinary journal for other interested parties concerned with the causes and analyses of environmental and sustainability problems and their solutions.

For more information on this 2015 GAiA issue and how to purchase it, please find it here.

I took this photograph in Bali, Indonesia in 2007 of an Indigenous man with his mouth covered by a UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) gag during an Indigenous Peoples’ protest at the climate conference.

Indigenous peoples were protesting their exclusion from the official negotiations even though it is their lands that are being sought to provide resources and carbon offsets to allow companies to pursue business as usual in the face of mounting climate disasters. – Orin Langelle

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*9 Smurf Day_0870699-R1-E012

Earth First! and “Mud People” present a check to the 1990 Earth Day (Smurf Day) Committee in St. Louis, Missouri. Monsanto was the main sponsor of the event.

The action was the feature evening news story on a major television network affiliate in St. Louis with a reporter attempting to interview a mud person. An Earth First! “translator” fielded the reporter’s questions in English and then translated to the mud person in mud language; the mud person responded in mud language and then the Earth First! translator gave the answer to the reporter.

The above photo is part of Orin Langelle’s exhibit Struggles for Justice: Forests, Land and Human Rights  – Late 80s to Late 90s at Buffalo’s ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery in Buffalo, NY. The exhibit runs through 19 June 2015.

 

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Forest Cover 47: Bioenergy Special Edition, covers many different issues that are very much connected to the fate of our planet including bioenergy, and all that that falls under that category. Covered also are  genetically engineered trees, GMO soy, unsustainable livestock production and much more.

I photographed the front and back covers of this publication, Forest Cover 47: Bioenergy Special Edition, by the Global Forest Coalition.  The front cover was photographed in Mapuche Territory (Chile). And my photo essay “The Pillaging of Paraguay” is featured inside.

The print edition can be downloaded in this hi-resolution PDF.  To subscribe to future editions of Forest Cover, please send an email to <gfc@globalforestcoalition.org>

***forestcover-big2-1

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EXHIBIT PREVIEW: STRUGGLES FOR JUSTICE

From: Step Out Buffalo

BY BRETT SMITH / ART, CULTURE & ARTS / MARCH 31, 2015

Pikes Peak – This activist was arrested for handing out fliers that urged the public to write their senators and congressmen about the Kearsarge North Timber sale in the White Mountain National Forest of NH. The arrest occurred in North Conway, NH, after a Northeast EF! Regional Rendezvous. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

This activist was arrested for handing out fliers that urged the public to write their senators and congressmen about the Kearsarge North Timber sale in the White Mountain National Forest of NH. The arrest occurred in North Conway, NH, after a Northeast EF! Regional Rendezvous. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

The rise of social media and the ubiquity of mobile devices allow us access to protests around the world and in real time. However, just 25 years ago – only photographers like Orin Langelle could give society a glimpse of the regional protests taking place in the forests of the MidWest or slums of England.

Starting this Friday, April 3, Langelle’s photography will be on display in Struggles for Justice: Forests, Land and Human Rights – Late 80s to Late 90s. The opening reception for the exhibit is taking place as a part of the opening of the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery and Allentown’s First Fridays.

Langelle, an Allentown resident, has been documenting social change since the 1970s through “concerned photography,” or the idea that photography itself can be an agent of change. He recently told me that while the point of protesting is to achieve a result, sometimes the act of speaking out itself and its documentation can be just as powerful.

“It’s the struggle that’s important,” Langelle said. “Phil Ochs, the old folk singer, once said that it’s not about winning – it’s about the act, to show that the human spirit is alive.”

Looking over the photos from the exhibit, it’s apparent that Langelle’s lens was able to capture a range of scenes, from desperation to absurdity, in the span of just a few years.

Cree Elder Woman in Whapmagoostui (1993) in the James and Hudson Bay regions of Northern Quebec, Canada. One of the people involved in the day-to-day struggle against the multinational Hydro-Quebec. The people were already impacted by the nearly completed La Grande (Phase 1) Project and also with the people fighting to stop Phase II, the Great Whale Project. Hydro-Quebec’s La Grande project dam that flooded thousands of hectares on Cree land, displacing all Cree in that area. An untimely water release from this dam drowned 10,000 migrating caribou. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

Cree Elder Woman in Whapmagoostui (1993) in the James and Hudson Bay regions of Northern Quebec, Canada. One of the people involved in the day-to-day struggle against the multinational Hydro-Quebec. The people were already impacted by the nearly completed La Grande (Phase 1) Project and also with the people fighting to stop Phase II, the Great Whale Project.
Hydro-Quebec’s La Grande project dam that flooded thousands of hectares on Cree land, displacing all Cree in that area. An untimely water release from this dam drowned 10,000 migrating caribou. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

In 1993, he was able to capture the heart-wrenching image of an older Cree native woman who was involved in a day-to-day struggle against Hydro-Quebec, the utility that displaced thousands of Cree with the construction of a massive dam project. In 1989, his camera snapped the image of mostly naked people from a group called Earth First! dancing in the New Mexico desert after declaring war on the US.

On top of a tripod during a Forest Activist Training Week in northeast VT. (1998) The Forest Activist Training Weeks lasted many years and hundreds of activists were trained in non-violent direct action, including blockading, banner making, climbing, tree-sitting, and tripod construction. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

On top of a tripod during a Forest Activist Training Week in northeast VT. (1998) The Forest Activist Training Weeks lasted many years and hundreds of activists were trained in non-violent direct action, including blockading, banner making, climbing, tree-sitting, and tripod construction. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

One of the photos included in the exhibit, taken in 1998, is of a massive tripod that protesters used to block various roadways. However, this technique has fallen out of favor as authorities have learned how to safely bring down the tripod by cutting slices out of each leg in succession, causing it to lower slowly to the ground.

SOB_large 38 tripod-2
On top of a tripod during a Forest Activist Training Week in northeast VT. (1998) The Forest Activist Training Weeks lasted many years and hundreds of activists were trained in non-violent direct action, including blockading, banner making, climbing, tree-sitting, and tripod construction. / Photo Credit: © PhotoLangelle.org

Langelle told me he has seen a lot change in protests over the years, the biggest change coming after 9/11. After the terror attacks and subsequent rolling out of anti-terror measures in law enforcement, Langelle said he noticed a scaling back of protester tactics.

“It’s had an effect,” he said. “But I’m seeing a lot of young people that are becoming a lot more militant. I think there’s probably going to be a lot of protests around the UN meetings in Paris in late November, early December. I’m not really sure what’s going to happen.”

“I don’t want to say (protesters) are going to be more aggressive, but maybe not as polite,” he added.

As far as exhibit visitors go, Langelle said he wants people to walk away thinking about the long history of protest culture and how its documentation can shape that way we look at society.

For more information on Struggles For Justice: Forests, Land and Human Rights and ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery, visit photolangelle.org/buen-vivir-gallery.

Struggles For Justice: Forests, Land and Human Rights – Late 80s to Late 90s

Where: ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery @ 148 Elmwood Ave. in Buffalo

When: Opening Friday April 3

Time: 7-9 p.m.

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