LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social and ecological injustice

Posts from the ‘Exhibit’ category

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Buffalo, NY–On January 27, CEPA Gallery (Contemporary Photography & Visual Arts Center) opened the 2017 CEPA Gallery Members’ Exhibition. Photographers Natalie Dilenno and Orin Langelle received the 2017 Exhibition Awards.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno
CEPA Underground Gallery

Both Langelle and Dilenno will have a solo exhibit at the CEPA Gallery in 2018. CEPA Gallery’s 2017 Members’ Exhibition features the photography and photo-related work of some of Western New York’s most talented artists.

The exhibit runs until March 4, 2017.

The juror was Maiko Tanaka, the new Executive Director at Squeaky Wheel Film and Media Arts Center.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle
CEPA Underground Gallery

Langelle is the Director of the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art and Langelle Photography in Buffalo, NY. Langelle also serves as the Strategic Communications Director of Global Justice Ecology Project.

Langelle Photography and the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art are part of Global Justice Ecology Project’s Social Justice Media Program.

Orin Langelle is a concerned photographer, who for four decades has been documenting social and environmental struggles.

Since 1972 Langelle has documented peoples’ resistance to war, corporate globalization, ecological destruction and human rights abuses. His first photographic assignment was to cover the protests against the Vietnam War at the 1972 Republican National Convention in Miami Beach. Langelle’s Exhibition Award photograph was from that first assignment (below).

Republican National Convention—Miami Beach, FL 1972 Wounded soldier from Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) in a wheelchair during protests against the RNC. He was one of over 200,000 U.S. casualties in that war. Photo: Langelle

Republican National Convention—Miami Beach, FL 1972 – Wounded soldier from Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) in a wheelchair during protests against the RNC. Photo: Langelle

Langelle says, “I approach my role as concerned photographer by not merely documenting the struggle for social and ecological justice, but by being an active part of it. This has enabled me to garner the trust of many of the subjects I have documented, allowing me access that would not have been possible otherwise. In this way, I have been able to expose the truth that is so often hidden by the powers of injustice.”

He continues, “My work is an historical look at social movements, struggle and everyday life.  It is designed to counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer—especially with regard to the history of social and ecological struggles. This is not merely a chronicling of history, but a call out to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a new history.  For there has been no time when such a call has been so badly needed.”

When asked about her Exhibit Award photo, Natalie Dilenno says, “I’ve been studying Yves Kline and appropriated that image because he influences my work so much.”

She continued, “I’ve been making blue artworks recently, so he’s been a major reference for the blue and his concepts that deal with the notion of the ‘void’. A whole. That image is just a more literal explanation of this idea than his blue paintings (and my blue abstract photographs).”

[Note]: Many in the art world consider Yves Klein the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. Klein (1928 – 1962) said, “The imagination is the vehicle of sensibility. Transported by the imagination, we attain life, life itself, which is absolute art.”


Photographs of Natalie Dilenno and Orin Langelle, courtesy CEPA Gallery.

The CEPA Gallery is located at 617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203. Viewing hours are Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

More about CEPA after the current exhibits:

Other Exhibits that Opened January 27 at CEPA

 

David Jaan: I See People

David-Jaan-Portfolio-Featured-Image

Lingxiang Wu: A Modern Flaneur’s Possession

Linxiang-Wu-Portfolio-Featured-Image

Exterior Views: The Richardson Olmsted Complex

Cepa_Gallery_Lavin_Thomas_Towers_DetailsandAbstractions_first_place-1

Located in Buffalo’s historic Market Arcade Complex, CEPA Gallery is a full-service contemporary photography and visual arts center with impact in both the local and national communities serving approximately 300,000 individuals annually.

With four galleries of changing exhibits and events, multimedia public art installations, arts education programs, and an open-access darkroom and digital photo lab, CEPA creates a vibrant presence in the heart of downtown Buffalo.

CEPA’s programs are made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Originally incorporated as the Center for Exploratory and Perceptual Art to serve as a community darkroom and exhibition space, CEPA Gallery was founded during the Alternative Space Movement in May 1974 by recent graduates of the University of Buffalo.

Throughout its history, CEPA has strived to reflect the creative priorities for working artists, while growing to accommodate the educational and social needs of Western New York’s diverse community. Over the years, CEPA has evolved into a nationally recognized arts center that is truly international in scope, but regional in spirit. It is now one of the oldest and largest not-for-profit photography-based arts centers in the United States.

CEPA remains dedicated to photography and the photo-related and electronic arts, and has developed its programs and opportunities to provide working artists, urban youth, and other individuals with the necessary programs and facilities for the production and reception of contemporary art.

 

 

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langelle-killsme_dsc_02761Featured Langelle Photography home page slider (right) was taken by Langelle during a protest march in Durban, South Africa during the United Nations Climate Conference in 2011. Langelle has six photographs in this touring show

 

Critical Information Collective Exhibit – World Social Forum 2016

Indigenous protesters at UN climate negotiations in Cancun 2010) Photo: Luka Tomac

Indigenous protesters at UN climate negotiations in Cancun (2010) Photo: Luka Tomac

Montreal, Canada – A photographic exhibit, Climate Change: Realities and Resistance, will be shown at the World Social Forum 2016 in Montreal from 9 – 14 August. This is the Canadian premier of Critical Information Collective‘s touring exhibition.

The World Premier took palace in Paris, France during the United Nations Climate Conference in 2016 and the North American debut was at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art in Buffalo, New York, 1 March through 29 April 2016.

CIC’s photos in Buffalo, Climate Change—Realities and Resistance, were part of the show Climate Change, System Change, Personal Change. Langellle Photography and ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery Director, Orin Langelle’s portion of the show in Paris, Buffalo and Montreal is entitled Struggles for Justice.

The exhibition in Montreal will include new panels focusing on the theme of industrial livestock farming and its impact on climate change and biodiversity.

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Volunteers Needed for the !Buen Vivir! Gallery

The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art at 148 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo NY, is currently seeking volunteers to help with staffing the gallery during open hours on Fridays 6 – 8 p.m. &  Saturdays 1 – 3 p.m., as well as helping with special projects. Our educational gallery with free admission hosts 3-4 shows per year and was founded to present an historical look at movements for change, struggle and everyday life. If interested please email Carolyn Lansom, Gallery Manager, <carolyn@globaljusticeecology.org> or call 716.931.5833.

Our current show runs through, April 29th Climate Change, System Change, Personal Change features two exhibits:

1. Climate Change—Realities and Resistance, photographs by Critical Information Collective (CIC)
2. Black on the Ground, White in the Air, artwork by Ashley Powell
This multi-faceted art and photographic show is designed to challenge viewers to think about what type of changes are necessary to effectively confront the root causes driving the extreme weather that is occurring globally.

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¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art announces a special Artist’s Talk for the show Climate Change, System Change, Personal Change by artist Ashley Powell on First Friday, April 1 at 7 p.m. The gallery is located at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo, NY’s Allentown District.

Artist’s Talk: Powell will discuss her work and its relation to environmental racism, a topic of special relevance right now in light of the rising awareness of rising rates of lead poisoning in poor children and children of color in Flint Michigan, as well as right here in Buffalo.  Powell’s installation challenges people to think about environmental racism and classism.

Artwork: 2016 Ashley Powell, The Solution (To All Our Problems) Water Filter - 2016

Artwork: 2016 Ashley Powell, The Solution (To All Our Problems) Water Filter – 2016

The show Climate Change, System Change, Personal Change includes two interrelated exhibits:

       • Black on the Ground, White in the Air, artwork from Ashley Powell
       • Climate Change—Realities and Resistance, by international photographers from the Critical Information Collective makes its US debut after hanging at the UN Paris climate summit in December

The artist’s talk will be held on First Friday, April 1 at 7 p.m. at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo. The gallery will be open for First Friday from 6-9 p.m.

Wine and hors d’oeuvres provided. The show runs through April 29.

For further information please contact Kip Doyle, Media Coordinator, +1.716.867.4080  <kip@globaljusticeecology.org>

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Note: This comes from The Public, a widely read weekly in the Buffalo, NY region. I want to point out that Climate Change: Realities and Resistance is an international exhibit first displayed at the UN climate negotiations in Paris last December. The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery is pleased to host it’s first viewing in North America. The photography exhibit was curated by the Critical Information Collective.  – Orin Langelle

Events

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Photo: Luka Tomac [Croatia] Indigenous protestors at UNF climate negotiations in Cancun, Mexico (2010)

Photo: Luka Tomac [Croatia] Indigenous protestors at UNF climate negotiations in Cancun, Mexico (2010)

by Evan James

[ART] The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery presents a thought provoking look at some of today’s most troubling issues in Climate Change, System Change, Personal Change. Intended to explore the causes of climate change, and how racism, classism, and environmental destruction play into it, this show contains Climate Change: Realities and Resistance, a national exhibit featuring pictures from climate photographers, and Black on the Ground, White in the Air, an exhibit from artist Ashley Powell who made national waves with her “White Only” art project at UB. This exhibit opens Friday, March 4 running from 6pm to 9pm, but the exhibit will be on display until April 29.

When:
Fri Mar. 4, 6:00pm

Where:
Buen Vivir

148 Elmwood
Buffalo, NY

This article can be found in The Public here.

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The industrial revolution may have brought technological advances, but its reliance on fossil fuels also means that dirty technologies have proliferated, with consequences for our environment and our climate. Photo: Bogdan Bousca (Romania) bogdanbousca.finegallery.net

The industrial revolution may have brought technological advances, but its reliance on fossil fuels also means that dirty technologies have proliferated, with consequences for our environment and our climate. Photo ©: Bogdan Bousca (Romania) bogdanbousca.finegallery.net

Paris, France – Telling the story of the growing global demand for climate justice, featuring images from photographers in Australia, Croatia, Romania, the UK and the USA. This exhibition is on display in Paris during the UNFCCC COP 21 negotiations, at the Climate Action Zone (ZAC), 7-11 December. The address is Room Ecuries C, Centquatre, 5, rue Curial, 75019 Paris. (The closest metro stations are Stalingrad and Riquet.)

It includes images from the following Critical Information Collective photographers, in panels of six images: David Tao (Australia), Luka Tomac (Croatia), Bogdan Bousca (Romania), Orin Langelle (USA), Jason Taylor (UK), and JudithDeland (Australia). There is a seventh panel comprising images from Stephen D Melkisethian (USA), Susan Melkisethian (USA), Joseph O Holmes (USA) and Ronnie Hall (UK).

For the exhibit, please go to UN Climate Conference of the Parties 21 (COP 21) Exhibition: Climate Change—Realities and Resistance

The second showing of this exhibit will be at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery in Buffalo, NY. The exhibit opens there on 4 March 2016. That show will include work by artist Ashley Powell.

Notice that Orin Langelle, Buen Vivir! Gallery director, has one of the panels, Struggles for Justice, with six photographs in the Paris show, that is coming to Buffalo.

 

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Global Justice Ecology Project and the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery invite you to our annual winter Solstice Party.  This is also the closing reception of the gallery exhibit The End of the Game, The Last Words from Paradise – Revisited.

This year the party and closing reception take place on Thursday, December 17th from 6-9 p.m. at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo.

​Camel's Hump, Vermont. Photo: Petermann

​Camel’s Hump, Vermont. Photo: Petermann

Gallery Director Orin Langelle and GJEP Executive Director Anne Petermann will give brief presentations at 7 p.m. about the mission of the gallery and GJEP including ways you can get involved.

There will be music, wine, hors d’oeuvres, and we will celebrate the Solstice and the return of longer days.

We also hope to have some exciting news to share about a new venue for Orin Langelle’s historic exhibit: The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited. If you haven’t seen it yet, this will be your last chance to see it in Buffalo…

​Truman Capote with Peter Beard at Studio 54 during Beard’s 40th birthday party. This photo by Orin Langelle was published in the Adventures and Misadventures of Peter Beard in Africa, by Jon Bowmaster (1993)

​Truman Capote with Peter Beard at Studio 54 during Beard’s 40th birthday party. This photo by Orin Langelle was published in the Adventures and Misadventures of Peter Beard in Africa, by Jon Bowmaster (1993)

Event is Free and Open to the Public. Casual dress.

See you there!

Info: 716.931.5833

Anne Petermann
Orin Langelle

 

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unnamed-3The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery is pleased to be able to release the online version of the exhibit that appeared in our gallery last July.  This documentary Multimedia online essay is titled: Free Speech – Earth Liberation Front Press Office April 5, 2001: Communications Equipment Seized by FBI Released 14 Years Later (Returned Objects: A Multimedia Art Installation)

Below is an edited excerpt from the Gallery statement about the exhibit:

Art means many different things

At the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery, the exhibits we choose illustrate and demonstrate the intersection of the realms of art and politics regarding the times in which we live.

Sometimes art should creatively communicate the reality hidden behind the propaganda we encounter in or our daily lives, where most communication is designed to sell something you probably do not need or that makes you feel good about yourself–from McMansions to reality shows, to drugs and/or belief systems with  no mental challenge.

In this exhibit, we demonstrate how art and Free Speech are intrinsically tied together. Fourteen years ago the FBI raided the Earth Liberation Front’s Press Office in Oregon and confiscated their communications equipment. The equipment seized by the FBI, along with related photography, news clips and Federal Agency documents are now on display online in Free Speech – Earth Liberation Front Press Office April 5, 2001: Communications Equipment Seized by FBI Released 14 Years Later (Returned Objects: A Multimedia Art Installation)

A group of artists and activists worked almost a month to turn a pile of obsolete office equipment seized from Burning Books co-owner Leslie James Pickering during the 2001 FBI raid into an installation highlighting free speech, art and state repression.

In addition to the now released office equipment (still tagged as evidence), the show features censored government documents, photographs, first-hand accounts, and statements by Pickering and Civil Rights attorney Michael Kuzma.

It is ludicrous and absurd that the FBI held these objects for fourteen years. If there were any incriminating evidence, it would likely have been found very quickly. The seizure of the equipment, and its confiscation for fourteen years, was intended to squash free speech.

This exhibit is about art, the repression and liberation of free speech and maybe a subliminal or not so subliminal message: In a world where we see more and more potentially apocalyptic scenes, especially with increasingly common climate catastrophes, is “civilization” and the dominant economic system pushing the inhabitants on Earth to the brink?

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A photo exhibit, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited opened at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery in Buffalo. Friday, 9 October 2015. Photos by Orin Langelle.  It will continue through 17 December with a special Allentown First Friday Reception on 6 November.

The Gallery is located at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo. Hours are from 1:30 to p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 6 to 8 p.m. Friday evenings and I to 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

1977, International Center of Photography

 Jackie Kennedy Onassis and Peter Beard at his 1977, International Center of Photography opening in Manhattan, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise.

2015 is the 50th anniversary of artist Peter Beard’s book, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise. Beard spent many years in Africa documenting the impact of Western civilization on elephants, other wildlife and the people who lived there. In 1977 Beard had the first one-person show at Manhattan’s International Center of Photography, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise.

Over four months, Orin Langelle photographed Beard and the people, many celebrities, that were part of Beard’s life prior to and during the exhibit’s installation and the subsequent opening, plus Beard’s 40th birthday party at Studio 54 in January of 1978.

Langelle’s photographs are of events surrounding Beard’s 1977’s The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise. The ICP installation consisted of Beard’s photographs, elephant carcasses, burned diaries, taxidermy, African artifacts, books and personal memorabilia. In the early 60s Beard worked at Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, during which time he photographed and documented the demise of over 35,000 elephants and 5,000 Black Rhinos.

Poster: Peter Beard hhotos

Poster: Peter Beard photos

Langelle’s work at the International Center of Photography gave him a rare insight into Beard, whose controversial views on ecology then, are just as relevant today.

With the support of the Peter Beard Studio, ¡Buen Vivir! presents this exhibition to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Beard’s book, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise.

The book, soon to be released, can be ordered from Taschen.

Below are two photos from the opening of the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery exhibit in Buffalo last Friday 9 October taken by Anne Petermann, Executive Director, Global Justice Ecology Project.

*W A4

*W A5

More photos, like the one below from the exhibit can be found here

4***7PS-Truman Capote_ICP-OL-7Peter Beard and Truman Capote at Beard’s 40th birthday party, 22 January 1978, held in Studio 54

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Photographer Peter Beard revisited at iBuen Vivir! gallery

> BY JACK FORAN             Artvoice Weekly Edition » Issue v14n44 (11/05/2015) » Art Scene

top
The deeper the white man went into Africa, the faster the life flowed out of it…vanishing in acres of trophies and hides and carcasses. —Peter Beard

r1The current show at ¡Buen Vivir! gallery commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of celebrity photographer and visual artist and environmentalist Peter Beard’s art book exposé on the r2 mass destruction of African elephant herds and other wildlife. The book, entitled The End of the Game-—The Last Word from Paradise, is being reprinted this year in an anniversary edition by the publisher Taschen. The exhibit is titled The End of the Game—The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited. The exhibit consists of photos by Orin Langelle and photos and artwork and writing by Beard. Several copies of the reprint edition of the book are available for inspection, and some of his mad scramble of words and pictures artworks. Wall copy text explains how, beginning in the 1960s, working at Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park, Beard photographed and documented the demise of more than 35,000 elephants and 5,000 Black Rhinos.

Beard was and is a complicated person and his conservation message is complex. Too complex perhaps for the mass media to quite grasp. The demise of big game African wildlife, as Beard saw it, was primarily due to misguided conservation efforts. The media preferred to focus on something more simple and straightforward, like poaching. Further explained in wall copy. In the 1980s, a CBS Sixty Minutes segment attributed the die-off of wildlife at the more than 5,000-square-mile Tsavo East park primarily to poaching. Beard contended that the conservation effort that resulted in establishment of the park was more the heart of the problem.

Long before the 1948 creation of the park—which Beard avers was instigated more by European “game-savers,” as he calls them, than indigenous Africans—native hunter-gatherer tribes co-existed with the elephants. Kept the elephant population in balance was the idea. Following the creation of the park, Beard says, the native hunter-gatherers were rounded up and imprisoned for “poaching,” which then resulted in elephant overpopulation, which led to depletion of food stocks and sources in the elephant habitat area, and ultimately desertification of the habitat area, and elephants died of starvation in vast numbers.

Beard wrote that in the early days of his work in the Tsavo East park, in the 1960s, conservation authorities estimated a total of three thousand elephants inhabited the park. Later, some Ford Foundation scientists counted forty thousand elephants in the park. Beard said the Ford Foundation scientists were forced to resign for suggesting overpopulation as the problem.

A letter explaining the more complex—than poaching—situation was hand-delivered along with a copy of Beard’s book to a number of cognizant individuals in the Sixty Minutes program, including Morley Safer and Harry Reasoner, but had no effect. The Tsavo East show—unaltered—was rerun several months later.

The Langelle photos document two celebrational events of Beard’s career. A 1977 one-person show of Beard’s work at the Manhattan International Center of Photography, and the next year, 1978, his fortieth birthday party at Studio 54 in New York City. Lots of celebrities present at both events. To name some of the better known: Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Caroline Kennedy, Kurt Vonnegut. Some unidentified knockout beautiful women. Beard is 77 now, but in his earlier years he was movie star good looking, and based on the photos did not lack for female admirers. For a while he was married to Cheryl Tiegs.

Many beautiful women, none more so than Iman in a photo by Beard at his home base, called Hog Ranch, near Nairobi. The caption says Beard “discovered” Iman, who subsequently moved to the United States to start a modeling career, and that she is currently married to David Bowie.

The End of the Game—The Last Word from Paradise, Revisited exhibit continues until December 17.

[¡Buen Vivir! Gallery note: We our having a First Friday Reception tomorrow night, 6 November from 6 – 9 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres served.  ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery, 148 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY. Top photo model and actress Lauren Hutton and artist Peter Beard; 1st right photo: artist Andy Warhol; and 2nd right photo: Exhibit designer Marvin Israel (left) and Peter Beard. All three photos by Orin Langelle at the International Center of Photography – 1977.]

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