LANGELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Using the power of photojournalism to expose social and ecological injustice

Photographed at Lago Tinquilco – one of several lagos in Huerquehue Parque Nacional in the La Araucanía Region in southern Chile. Huerquehue Parque Nacional (Spanish pronunciation: [werˈkewe]) is located in the foothills of the Andes, in the Valdivian temperate rainforest.

Huerquehue is a Mapudungun word (the language of the Mapuche people) that means “the messenger’s place”. One of the most noteworthy features Huerquehue Parque Nacional are its ancient Araucaria (Araucaria araucana) forests, the tree commonly known as “monkey puzzle”. These are the backdrop for the clear lagos and lagoons that dot the park, including Lago Tinquilco, which lies in the lower portion of this protected area.

I am on a northern hemisphere summer break. I will not be checking this email. If this is urgent and you need to contact me, please email Anne Petermann <anne@globaljusticeecology.org> or call her mobile at +1.716.364.1188. Thank you.

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Tree biotechnology company ArborGen is requesting an unprecedented USDA approval: a genetically engineered (GE) eucalyptus tree, modified to be “freeze tolerant”

Arrest at the 2013 Tree Biotechnology Conference held in Asheville, NC. Photo: Langelle

If approved, this will be the first-ever GE forest tree to be commercially grown in the U.S. and would open the door to many other genetically engineered forest trees like poplar and pine. Massive, unregulated industrial GE eucalyptus plantations containing millions of GE trees would wreak havoc on the environment by destroying natural forests, polluting and depleting water, and endangering biodiversity.  Unfortunately, the Trump USDA has now formally proposed the approval of these dangerous GE trees.

YOU can help stop them! Please sign on below!

Non-native eucalyptus plantations would be huge biologically dead zones devoid of biodiversity. And combined with the hot dry winds of climate change, they become “explosively flammable”–a huge wildfire risk for regions already suffering droughts. Just look at what happened in Portugal’s eucalyptus plantations last week where 64 people were killed.

Trees live for decades to centuries and spread their seeds and pollen over huge distances.  Once released in plantations, these GE trees can never be recalled.

Sign on now to demand the USDA reject these disastrous GMO trees!  Help stop them before it is too late!  The deadline is JULY 5!

Industrial pine plantations have already replaced one in five forested acres in the US South, destroying biodiversity and ecosystems. In the Global South, timber plantations not only destroy forests, they displace Indigenous and poor rural people. If approved by the USDA, GE eucalyptus trees would be the next step in the process of converting native forests to industrial tree farms. GE eucalyptus trees have the potential to wreak havoc by invading native forests, depleting fresh water and being explosively flammable.

Global Justice Ecology Project

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Published 17 June 2017 / from this online magazine in Buenos Aires, Argentina:

UN MUNDO DE SENSACIONES 17/06/2017BY PUROCHAMUYO

BOSQUE QUEMADO. PLATA ROBADA. VIDAS SEGADAS
Pasaron pocos meses desde los fuegos devastadores que acabaron con 500.000 hectáreas en la región central de Chile. Comenzaron en enero 2017.

El Observatorio Latinoamericano de Conflictos Ambientales (OLCA) patrocinó una delegación internacional de la que formó parte el reportero gráfico norteamericano Orin Langelle, que publica hoy purochamuyo.com / Cuadernos de Crisis sus fotos y su observación.

La delegación internacional de la Campaña Alto a los Árboles Transgénicos* llegó el 20 de marzo a Santiago de Chile para documentar los impactos sociales y ambientales que ha tenido la industria forestal, y sus consecuencias.

*Campaña Alto a los Árboles Transgénicos

Tras los incendios, está la mano de las políticas pinochetistas. Sí. Ahí también. En 1974, a menos de un año del golpe contra el gobierno constitucional de Salvador Allende, se estableció el Decreto Forestal Ley 701, que subvencionó la expansión de los monocultivos de árboles, regalando la Corporación Forestal Nacional. Esto dio inicio a la gran expansión de plantaciones de monocultivos de pino y eucalipto para las fábricas de papel y madera. Desde entonces, muchas corporaciones han comprado tierra, destruyendo los bosques nativos que antes abundaban.

el Decreto Forestal Ley 701,  de Pinochet, subvencionó la expansión de los monocultivos de árboles y regaló la Corporación Forestal Nacional

Mientras la presidente chilena Michelle Bachelet ratificaba la “intencionalidad” de algunos de los incendios desatados en ese país, se confirmaba que había 43 detenidos, 11 muertos y más de 3 mil personas estaban afectadas. 1500 habían perdido su casa y su hacienda.

 

Please go to Argentinian site to see the rest of this photo essay…

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Langelle photographing remnants of the worst fires in Chile’s history. Photo: Petermann

 

 

English Interview with Spanish subtitles (Entrevista en inglés subtítulos en español)

Source: No a la IUFRO en Concepción

 

Entrevista destacada Orin Langelle

En 1974 se creó el decreto de ley 701

Con ello se han plantado más de 3 millones de hectáreas de pino y eucaliptus.
Provocando migración forzada, pérdida de fuentes de agua y suelos fértiles, desaparición de bosque nativo y desertificación en el centro y sur de Chile
El 70% de este negocio forestal pertenece a los grupos Matte y Angelini.

Entre el 4 y 9 de junio la Universidad de Concepción, el Gobierno Regional, FONDECYT y empresas transnacionales de biotecnología se dan cita en la V conferencia de la Unión Internacional de Organizaciones de Investigación Forestal IUFRO para fomentar y potenciar un modelo depredador.

Por el agua y nuestros Bosques: Ni Expansión, ni árboles Transgénicos

Más información: stopgetrees.org – olca.cl
Contacto: noalaiufro@gmail.com

Fotografía: Miguel Hechenleitner – Orin Langelle

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People protesting Genetically Engineered Trees in front of the IUFRO conference. Photo: Langelle

Genetically Engineered Trees Conference Met with Protest in Chile

5 June 2017

Concepción, Chile – People from Chile representing social movements, Indigenous organizations and environmental justice groups marched to the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) 2017 Tree Biotechnology Conference on its opening day here. They were stopped outside of the conference by the Carabinero police forces. There were no arrests.

The protests occurred simultaneous to the first session of the IUFRO conference, “Chilean Forestry and Adoption of New Technologies,” hosted by the Chilean Forest Association (CORMA) and Arauco, one of the two largest forestry companies in the country.

The Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees [1] is in Concepción to monitor the conference sessions and to be in solidarity with groups organizing a week of counter-conference activities in the city [2]. The Campaign is posting news and photos from the week of events on its Chile Blog.

The IUFRO conference being targeted due to its promotion of genetically engineered (GE) trees [3] and the advancement of the Chilean forestry model, which includes vast monoculture plantations of pine and eucalyptus trees.

At the public declaration At the declaration against the Chilean forestry model. Photo: Langelle

(Left) A public declaration against the Chilean forestry model was issued today by social movements of the Chilean and Mapuche peoples, stating that, “Ending the prevailing forest model is a matter of life or death. We must put an end to the harmful effects of monoculture forestry: the ongoing water crisis, degradation of arable land, urban and rural poverty, loss of native forest, wetlands, ecosystems and the proliferation of forest fires.”

Anne Petermann, International Coordinator for the Campaign to STOP GE Trees stated, “Chile’s forestry model, advanced under the Pinochet dictatorship, has already resulted in wide ranging impacts.  It has displaced Mapuche communities from their ancestral lands, driving many communities into poverty and depleting their fresh water supply.” Additionally Peterman said, “Monoculture tree plantations devastated by insect infestation are also blamed for the worst wildfire season in the country’s history and many members of communities wiped out by the fires insist that the timber companies set fire to their own insect-damaged plantations to collect the insurance money.”

Notes:

[1] The Campaign to STOP GE Trees is an international coalition of organizations dedicated to protecting forests, biodiversity and forest dependent communities through the demand for a global rejection of all genetically engineered trees.  Organizations in the Campaign include Biofuelwatch (US and UK), Canadian Biotechnology Action Network, Field Liberation Movement (Belgium), Friends of the Earth Melbourne (Australia), GE Free New Zealand, Global Justice Ecology Project (US), Indigenous Environmental Network (North America), OLCA: Observatorio Latinoamericano de Conflictos Ambientales (Chile), and World Rainforest Movement (Brazil and Uruguay).

[2] The week of counter-conference activities is hosted by the Coordination for the Defense of the Territories, and the Movement for Water and the Territories.

[3] The entire day on Wednesday and portions of other days at the conference are devoted to advancements in the commercialization of genetically engineered trees.

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While staying at Refugio Tinquilco and relaxing after a working investigative trip to Chile, Anne Petermann and I walked down to Lago Tinquilco. It was a brief respite from the forest fires and then traveling southwards to see the  timber plantations encroaching further into Indigenous Mapuche territory we observed earlier this spring.

I photographed this view of Huerquehue Parque Nacional in color intentionally capturing it in black and white (not photo shopped). Maybe this image is an homage to the death and damage of the wildfires started earlier in Chile.

Lago Tinquilco is one of several lagos in Huerquehue Parque Nacional in the La Araucanía Region in southern Chile. Huerquehue Parque Nacional (Spanish pronunciation: [werˈkewe]) is located in the foothills of the Andes, in the Valdivian temperate rainforest.

Huerquehue is a Mapudungun word (the language of the Mapuche people) that means “the messenger’s place”. One of the most noteworthy features Huerquehue Parque Nacional are its ancient Araucaria (Araucaria araucana) forests, the tree commonly known as “monkey puzzle”. These are the backdrop for the clear lagos and lagoons that dot the park, including Lago Tinquilco, which lies in the lower portion of this protected area.

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Note: Ironically I am posting this on the Langelle Photography web page on May Day minus 1, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain; the city where this exhibit was photographed in 2008 – OL

An Opening Reception was held MAY 5th – 6 to 9 p.m. on First Friday at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo.

Wine and Hors d’Oeuvres were available

Exhibit closes May 26th

About the exhibit, from photographer Orin Langelle:

“I first exhibited this in Copenhagen, Denmark during the UN Convention on Climate Change in 2009 at the Klimaforum. It can be interpreted in many ways but my original take was on climate change and then others likened it to the fleeting movement of our existence. I’ve been urged by several artists to display the exhibit in Buffalo because they feel, as do I, in the age of Trump, we are in an existential crisis and the concept of humanity is rapidly disappearing.

“I shot the exhibit in Barcelona, Spain in 2008, in two nights while I stood on a balcony ledge photographing the people who passed by on the avenue below.”

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NEWS on Chile delegation investigation

An international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees arrived in Sanitago, Chile on 20 March 2017 to document the social and ecological impacts of industrial tree plantations in the country, and their link to the recent wildfires that were the worst in Chile’s history.

Español abajo

Português abaixo

Español abajo

Português abaixo

This above a one minute trailer for a short video we recently completed about the struggle of Brazil’s MST (Landless Worker’s Movement) against the vast expanses of industrial eucalyptus plantations in the country.

The trailer and the full video is in Portuguese, with Spanish spoken translation and English subtitles.

The video is an interview with an MST militant, Eliane Oliveira, that we conducted in March during a delegation of the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees in Chile.

We were there investigating the social and ecological impacts of industrial timber plantations on people, water, wildfires and ecosystems, as well as the potential for GE tree plantations to worsen these already severe impacts.

We brought Eliane Oliveira and two other organizers from Brazil to speak with the Indigenous Mapuche and other rural communities in Chile about the campaigns waged against eucalyptus plantations and GE trees in Brazil and the overlaps with the struggles against tree plantations in Chile. Eliane spoke about the MST campaign that is taking back land from the plantations to give to landless peasants in Brazil.

This interview emerged from that delegation and those conversations:

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UPDATE: The international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees (CSGETREES) completed their journey in Chile to document the social and ecological impacts of industrial tree plantations in the country, and their link to the recent wildfires that were the worst in Chile’s history.

Reports such as this from Biofuelwatch: Stop GE Trees Delegation Investigate Expansion of Wood-Derived Bioenergy in Chile are starting to be filed. Also posted was a radio interview with Anne Petermann from Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP) and CSGETREES on Pacifica’s flagship station, KPFK, in Los Angeles: GE Trees and Plantations in Chile.

Expect new postings several times a week. GJEP is going to release a video soon of a MST militant who was ob the delegation from Brazil. She speaks about land use, tree plantations, political prisoners and much more.

Please stay tuned to the Chile Blog

Photo of Chilean flag in front of some of the fire devastation. Photo: Langelle

Chile: Water is Life

(Posted while in Chile on the delegation.)

MAPU [Chile]-An international delegation from the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees arrived in Sanitago, Chile on 20 March 2017 to document the social and ecological impacts of industrial tree plantations in the country, and their link to the recent wildfires that were the worst in Chile’s history.

The delegation also traveled to Mapu, the ancestral lands of the Indigenous Mapuche (People of the Earth) to investigate the depletion of water caused by the timber plantations and how this loss of water is impacting Mapuche sovereignty and the ability of the people to stay on the lands they have occupied for thousands of years. Only 13% of Mapuche people still live in the countryside, largely due to the loss of water on their lands.  The delegation also examined the impacts on other communities’ water rights, climatic disruption, repression, as well as gender issues and effects on women. Please view the ongoing fact-finding trip on the Chile Blog.

*ALFREDODSC_0007 copy 2

(Rio Cautín near Temuco, Chile) Before an early morning water ceremony, Alfredo Seguel from Red de Defensa de los Territorios, an Indigenous Mapuche organization, speaks about the significance of this river to the Mapuche and the importance of water to all life.  Photo: Orin Langelle

From Santiago, the delegation traveled to Concepción where it visited communities devastated by massive wildfires.  It also traveled into the countryside to see the impacts on the people and the ecological damage caused by industrial monoculture pine and eucalyptus plantations. Members of the delegation visited several universities and were involved in presentations and community discussions. The delegation was sponsored by OLCA (Observatorio Latinoamericano de Conflictos Ambientales).

Due to the water required to grow pines and eucalyptus in the plantations, the communities' water supply is scarce. Photo Orin Langelle

Due to the water used by industrial monoculture plantations of pine and eucalyptus trees, there is a serious lack of water in rural communities, and some communities have no water at all.  Photo Orin Langelle

The community members that the delegation spoke to blamed the timber industry for starting the forest fires for insurance money. Many of the trees were heavily infested by insects and the fires provided insurance money to the industry for their lost trees.

All signs point to the potential in Chile for future plantations of genetically engineered trees, which would make these impacts much worse.

There will be a full report of the findings of the delegation’s investigation.


Additionally on 22 April there will be a gathering and march in Concepción called for by social movements with the theme Water is Life. This is prior to the International Union of Forest Research Organization’s (IUFRO) Tree Biotechnology Conference from 4-9 June in Concepción. Most of the scientific and industry people going to the IUFRO conference are pro-GE Trees.

For more information about the fact-finding trip to Chile with the international Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees on the Chile Blog.

 

 

 

 

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Peter Beard and Jackie Kennedy Onassis walk through crowd during the opening of The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise

MARCH 10, 2017 – The prominent online daily photo magazine L’Œil de la Photographie, of Paris and New York today published all of the photographs from Orin Langelle’s 2015 exhibit The End of the Game: The Last Word from Paradise – Revisited.

Langelle’s photos document photographer Peter Beard’s first one-person show at the International Center of Photography in Manhattan in 1977, including his 40th birthday party at Studio 54.

The photographs and accompanying article can be viewed in L’Œil de la Photographie
MARCH 10, 2017 – WRITTEN BY Anna Winand:

The End of the Game, Revisited English

Fin de partie – Dernier message du Paradis, Revisité French

About Langelle’s Exhibit:

Over four months Langelle photographed Beard and the people, many celebrities, that were part of Beard’s life prior to and during the exhibit’s installation and the subsequent opening, plus Beard’s 40th birthday party at Studio 54 in January of 1978.

Langelle’s photographs are of events surrounding Beard’s 1977’s The End of the Game. The ICP installation consisted of Beard’s photographs, elephant carcasses, burned diaries, taxidermy, African artifacts, books and personal memorabilia.

In the early 60s Beard worked at Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, during which time he photographed and documented (illegally) the demise of over 35,000 elephants and 5,000 Black Rhinos.

With the support of the Peter Beard Studio, ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery presented this exhibition to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Beard’s book, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise.

Langelle’s exhibit can be viewed at ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art

 

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Santiago, Chile (20 March 2017) – I am accompanying this international delegation to Chile to photograph the people and land we travel to. Details of the Chile blog below. – OL

**Chile_Villarrica_Langelle

Slider photo of Volcan Villarrica shot from Parque Nacional Huerquehue, Chile    photo: Langelle

*23 Chile-Z_LANGELLE_logtruckLog truck crossing bridge in Chile                                     photo: Langelle

About our New Chile Blog: Campaign to STOP GE Trees To Document Impacts of Tree Plantations in Chile

The blog page may need to be refreshed from time to time

More information about the fact-finding trip to Chile with the international Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees:

Ancient Araucaria forest in Chile                                               photo: Petermann 2004

Members of the Steering Committee of the Campaign to STOP GE Trees from four continents will are arriving in Chile from March 20-30 to meet with environmental justice groups and Mapuche communities about the ongoing impacts of industrial tree plantations in Chile, as well as the potential for future plantations of genetically engineered trees to make these impacts much worse.

We will be reporting from Mapuche communities and documenting these impacts on this blog as frequently as we can manage.

Please stay tuned.

Anne Petermann

Coordinator, Campaign to STOP GE Trees

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