As co-founder of Global Justice Ecology Project, former co-Director and Strategic Communications Director, now a consult for GJEP, I’m pleased to make this photograph available for some lucky winner. It’s archival, matted and mounted.

I’m also on the International Steering Committee for the Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees. I’ve been involved in the fight to stop genetically engineered trees since 1999 and I believe we have to stop this menace to the people, the planet and all of the Earth’s inhabitants.

I took this shot of the Ringed Kingfisher during a very grueling trip to Chile. Prior to taking a break by Lago Tinquilco I was documenting the social and ecological impacts of industrial tree plantations in the country, and their link to the 2017 wildfires that were the worst in Chile’s history. It is estimated that eleven people were killed, 1500 houses destroyed, thousands displaced and almost 300,000 hectares acres decimated. The delegation was sponsored by OLCA (Observatorio Latinoamericano de Conflictos Ambientales). I accompanied the delegation as a photojournalist and a participant.

Photographed at Lago Tinquilco – one of several lagos in Huerquehue Parque Nacional in the La Araucanía Region in southern Chile. Huerquehue Parque Nacional (Spanish pronunciation: [werˈkewe]) is located in the foothills of the Andes, in the Valdivian temperate rainforest.

Huerquehue is a Mapudungun word (the language of the Mapuche people) that means “the messenger’s place”. One of the most noteworthy features Huerquehue Parque Nacional are its ancient Araucaria (Araucaria araucana) forests, the tree commonly known as “monkey puzzle”. These are the backdrop for the clear lagos and lagoons that dot the park, including Lago Tinquilco, which lies in the lower portion of this protected area.