MOCAD Exhibit You Can’t Print That! 50 Years of The Fifth Estate Now Closed

Orin Langelle’s photo (below) was on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art-Detroit (MOCAD) in the exhibit  You Can’t Print That! 50 Years of The Fifth Estate. It ran Friday, September 11, 2015 through Sunday, January 3, 2016. The opening was September 10.

It was chosen to be in the display because the man on the right, Andy Smith, was a collective member of Fifth Estate. In the past, Langelle contributed to the publication and states, “I’m proud and feel privileged to be part of this important exhibit and respect the FE collective for its continued publication of alternative news and radical views,” stated Langelle.

Woman protester at Ground Zero (former site of the World Trade Center) as thousands converged on New York City for demonstrations against the 2004 Republican National Convention (RNC), over the war in Iraq and other issues Many New Yorkers expressed their anger throughout the convention, saying that then President George W. Bush and the Republican Party were had chosen New York City for their convention to take advantage of the 11 September 2001 World Trade Center attack.

Woman protester at Ground Zero (former site of the World Trade Center) as thousands converged on New York City for demonstrations against the 2004 Republican National Convention (RNC), over the war in Iraq and other issues.

Many New Yorkers expressed their anger throughout the convention, saying that then President George W. Bush and the Republican Party chose New York City for their convention to take advantage of the 11 September 2001 World Trade Center attack.

Fifth Estate, the nation’s oldest and still thriving underground newspaper, celebrates its 50th anniversary

Detroit – Fifth Estate, the nation’s oldest and still thriving underground newspaper, celebrates its 50th anniversary with exhibitions at two Detroit museums this fall. Together the exhibitions provide intimate insights into the influence of the radical media, with its affiliated artists and activists, in the greater Detroit area, throughout the United States, and around the globe.

You Can’t Print That: 50 Years of the Fifth Estate, on view inside the Mobile Homestead at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD), features a vast amount of cover art, provocative editorial cartoons, archival photographs, paintings and memorabilia recalling the iconic events, people, and institutions that informed the newspaper during its earliest days through the present.

Situated on the grounds of MOCAD, Mobile Homestead is a full-scale replica of Detroit born artist Mike Kelley’s childhood home that serves as a community gallery and gathering space for public events and activities in support of the social good.

You Can’t Print That is a perfect exhibition to present inside the Mobile Homestead as it’s a wonderful collision between Mike Kelley’s interest in DIY and America subcultures and a legendary underground publication that describes itself as an “anarchist, anti-capitalist, and anti-authoritarian, anti-profit project published cooperatively by a volunteer collective of friends and comrades.” MOCAD is additionally pleased to be working with the Detroit History Museum as this is a first and rare opportunity for one of the city’s youngest institutions to be paired with one of the oldest.”

The exhibition at MOCAD will be complimented by an overview of the highlights of the Fifth Estate at the Detroit Historical Museum (DHM) on view August 29, 2015 through August 2016. Start the Presses: 50 years of the Fifth Estate is a text and graphics driven installation, focusing mainly on the colorful early history of the papers and its impact on Detroit and its media.

You Can’t Print That: 50 Years of the Fifth Estate is co-curated by Peter Werbe and Barbara Logan in association with MOCAD’s Curator of Education and Public Engagement, Amy Corle.

The mission of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit is to present art at the forefront of contemporary culture. As a non-collecting institution, MOCAD is responsive to the cultural content of our time, fueling crucial dialogue, collaboration, and public engagement.

Further info on the Fifth Estate